CDFA Announces Recall of Raw Goat Milk Produced at Valley Milk Simply Bottled of Stanislaus County

By Steve Lyle, Director of Public Affairs, CDFA

Raw goat milk produced and packaged by Valley Milk Simply Bottled of Stanislaus County is the subject of a statewide recall and quarantine order announced by California State Veterinarian Dr. Annette Jones. The quarantine order came following the confirmed detection of the bacteria Campylobacter jejuni in the farm’s packaged raw whole goat milk sampled and tested by the California Department of Food and Agriculture.

The order applies to “Valley Milk Simply Bottled Raw Goat Milk” and “DESI MILK Raw Goat Milk” distributed in half-gallon (64 oz) plastic jugs with a code date marked on the container of OCT 21 2022 through OCT 31 2022.

Consumers are strongly urged to dispose of any product remaining in their refrigerators, and retailers are to pull the product immediately from their shelves. The current order does not include the farm’s raw cow milk.

CDFA found the campylobacter bacteria in a routine sample collected at the Valley Milk Simply Bottled production and packaging facility. No illnesses have been reported.

Symptoms of campylobacteriosis include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever. Most people with camplylobacteriosis recover completely. Illness usually occurs 2 to 5 days after exposure to campylobacter and lasts about a week. The illness is usually mild and some people with campylobacteriosis have no symptoms at all. However, in some persons with compromised immune systems, it can cause a serious, life-threatening infection. A small percentage of people may have joint pain and swelling after infection. In addition, a rare disease called Guillian-Barre syndrome that causes weakness and paralysis can occur several weeks after the initial illness.

2022-10-25T08:11:48-07:00October 25th, 2022|

California Dairy Research Foundation Awarded $85 Million from USDA for Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities Project

By Jennifer Giambroni, California Milk Advisory Board

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is investing up to $2.8 billion in projects selected under the first pool of the Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities funding opportunity. Applicants submitted more than 450 project proposals; 70 were selected for funding.

The California Dairy Research Foundation, in partnership with more than 20 other dairy organizations, was among the recipients. CDRF’s grant partners include California governmental organizations, corporations and cooperatives, universities, producer organizations, environmental organizations, and others. The USDA has established an estimated funding ceiling of $85 million for this project to advance climate-smart dairy farming; the final award will be granted in the coming months.

“CDRF is extremely pleased to have received this grant on behalf of the entire collaborative team. The project brings together organizations throughout the value chain to the benefit of our hard-working dairy producers and the environment. We look forward to working with the California Department of Food and Agriculture, the California Milk Advisory Board, Dairy Cares, the universities and others to implement this advanced climate-smart ag project in California’s dairy industry,” said CDRF’s Executive Director Denise Mullinax.

Over the next five years, the project, “Partnering to Invest in and Build Markets for California’s Climate-Smart Dairy Producers,” will work to build climate-smart dairy markets and provide financial incentives for California dairy producers to adopt climate-smart manure management practices to reduce both methane emissions and nitrogen surplus and will leverage matching funding from non-federal sources.

“This funding represents the next critical installment and chapter in California’s world-leading dairy methane reduction efforts,” said Michael Boccadoro, Executive Director of Dairy Cares. “On-farm projects will be designed to not only reduce methane but will significantly improve water quality outcomes, ensuring broad benefits for our rural farm communities.

Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities is part of USDA’s broader strategy to position agriculture and forestry as leaders in climate change mitigation through voluntary, incentive-based, market-driven approaches.

“Dairy families in California continue to step up to ensure the agriculture sector contributes to climate change mitigation and adaptation,” said Karen Ross, Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture. “The partnership between the State and dairy families has resulted in significant methane emission reductions making California a national and international leader in supporting on-farm livestock methane reductions using climate-smart agricultural management approaches and other environmental benefits, including improved water quality from dairy farms”.

Other partners supporting this project are California Department of Food and Agriculture, California Association of Resource Conservation Districts, California Milk Advisory Board, Dairy Cares, California Dairy Campaign, California Dairy Quality Assurance Program, Milk Producers Council, National Milk Producers Federation, Sustainable Conservation, Western United Dairies, California Farm Bureau Federation, University of California, Davis, University of California, Riverside, University of California Cooperative Extension, Truterra, California Dairies, Inc., Challenge Dairy Products, Nestlé.

2022-09-21T10:17:24-07:00September 21st, 2022|

California Dairy Innovation Center Offers Opportunities For Cheese Education

2022 Dairy Short Course Programs and Conference Schedule Released

By California Milk Advisory Board

The California Dairy Innovation Center announced the latest list of short courses which will be offered this year in collaboration with the Pacific Coast Coalition and industry instructors. Dates for an inaugural Dairy Products, Processing, and Packaging Innovation Conference were also announced.

The Frozen Desserts Innovation short course will be held on June 28th and 29th at the Dairy Innovation Institute, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo with a focus on capturing consumer trends: sugar-free, lactose-free and high protein. The short course features both lectures, demonstrations and actual ice cream manufacture in the Cal Poly pilot plant and creamery. In addition, a sales and marketing educational segment will provide practical guidance to entrepreneurs, and established brands alike. Registration is open at: https://dairy.calpoly.edu/short-course-symposia

The Advanced Unit Operations short course will take place September 27-29. Designed for those working in dairy plants, this course delivers both theoretical and practical understanding and knowledge of pasteurization, separation, condensation, filtration systems, drying, as well as principles of food safety. Program and registration will open June 1.

The California Dairy Innovation Center, in collaboration with Cal Poly, The Dairy Business Innovation Initiative, Pacific Coast Alliance, and Fresno State will hold a first ever conference on Dairy Products Processing and Packaging Innovation in Shell Beach, Calif, October 12th-14th. Featuring both national and international speakers, the conference focuses on consumer-driven innovation and the latest technological advances. Program outline and registration is open at: https://dairy.calpoly.edu/short-course-symposia

California is the nation’s leading milk producer, and produces more butter, ice cream and nonfat dry milk than any other state. California is the second-largest producer of cheese and yogurt. California milk and dairy foods can be identified by the Real California Milk seal, which certifies they are made with milk from the state’s dairy farm families.

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About the California Dairy Innovation Center
The California Dairy Innovation Center (CDIC) coordinates pre-competitive research and educational training in collaboration with industry, check-off programs, and research/academic institutions in support of a common set of innovation and productivity goals. The CDIC is guided by a Steering Committee that includes California Dairies Inc., California Dairy Research Foundation, California Milk Advisory Board, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Dairy Management Inc., Fresno State University, Hilmar Cheese, Leprino Foods, and UC Davis.

About Real California Milk/California Milk Advisory Board
The California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), an instrumentality of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, is funded by the state’s dairy farm families who lead the nation in sustainable dairy farming practices. With a vision to nourish the world with the wholesome goodness of Real California Milk, the CMAB’s programs focus on increasing demand for California’s sustainable dairy products in the state, across the U.S. and around the world through advertising, public relations, research, and retail and foodservice promotional programs. For more information and to connect with the CMAB, visit RealCaliforniaMilk.com, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

2022-05-20T08:38:10-07:00May 20th, 2022|

Real California Milk Spotlights Foodservice Innovation With 2022 Events For Professional Chefs

4th Annual Pizza Competition, CADairy2Go and Cal-Mex Invitational Events Showcase On-Trend Recipes and Techniques Using Real California Cheese and Dairy Products

By California Milk Advisory Board

The Foodservice Division of the California Milk Advisory Board today announced the kickoff date for the 4th Annual Real California Pizza Contest, the return of the CADairy2Go competition and the rollout of a new culinary event focusing on Cal-Mex to round out its foodservice events for 2022.

The 4th annual Real California Pizza Contest, a search for the best pizza recipes using cow’s milk cheeses from California, gets underway on March 1st. Professional chefs and pizzaiolos from throughout the U.S, can enter their innovative recipes from March 1 through April 24, 2022, for a chance to make it to the bake-off final on June 22, 2022, in Napa, Calif. and compete for up to $25,000 in prize money.

The CADairy2Go Invitational is inspired by chefs and foodservice operators who made quick, creative pivots to adjust their menus for the takeout and delivery model during the disruption caused by the pandemic. Now in its 2nd year, the event will feature culinary professionals representing a variety of foodservice backgrounds, such as major restaurant chains, independent restaurants, ghost kitchens and food trucks who will gather in October to compete for a chance at up to $5,000 for their innovative To-Go recipes.

The inaugural Cal-Mex Invitational, scheduled for August, captures creations from chefs who specialize in the culinary and flavor fusion of California and Mexican cuisines.

“Cheese is at the heart of culinary innovation – from creative pizzas to flavorful to-go and fusion dishes. As the leading producer of Hispanic-style cheese and dairy products, we’re excited to add the Cal-Mex Invitational to our foodservice outreach program and to see what the chef’s develop,”

said Mike Gallagher, Business and Market Development Consultant for the CMAB. “These competitions offer a tremendous opportunity to partner with culinary professionals to spotlight their creativity using our sustainably sourced Real California dairy products.” 

California is a reliable, consistent source of sustainable dairy products used by chefs throughout the world. As the nation’s largest dairy state, California boasts an impressive lineup of award-winning cheesemakers and dairy processors, that are helping to drive dining innovation.

California leads the nation in milk production and is responsible for producing more butter, ice cream and nonfat dry milk than any other state. The state is the second-largest producer of cheese and yogurt. California milk and dairy foods can be identified by the Real California Milk seal, which certifies they are made with milk from the state’s dairy farm families.

2022-02-16T08:56:00-08:00February 16th, 2022|

California Beef Council Announces New Executive Committee

By California Beef Council

The California Beef Council welcomed a new executive committee for 2022, with Cindy Tews of Fresno serving as chair for the coming year. Tews comes into the role on the heels of Tom Barcellos, who provided leadership and guidance as chair during 2021.

The announcement came at the close of the CBC’s annual meeting held December 7-8 at Pismo Beach. Tews takes the reins as the CBC begins its 68th year as the country’s oldest State Beef Council. Outgoing Chair Tom Barcellos of Porterville, will continue in an ex-officio role.

Tews is the co-owner of Fresno Livestock Commission, LLC, which has long had a role in the community. It is the only livestock market in Fresno County and serves as a gathering place where information is passed about beef quality assurance and the latest in production practices. The on-site café also provides a space for visitors to talk about what is going on in the community.

“As a CBC Board member, I get to see firsthand how invaluable that one Checkoff dollar is that is deducted for each head that we sell. I’m finding that dollar grows into so much more,” Tews said.

Looking ahead, the CBC plans to invest more than $1.2 million in 2022 to promote beef, provide consumer information, engage with foodservice and retail stakeholders, educate health and nutrition influencers, and provide educational and informational resources to beef producers.

The CBC Executive Committee includes:

  • Cindy Tews, chair (range)
  • Steven Maxey, vice chair (packer/processor)
  • Mike Williams (range)
  • Frank Gambonini (dairy)
  • Jarred Mello (dairy)
  • Mike Sulpizio (feeder)
  • Craig Finster (feeder)
  • Tom Barcellos, ex officio (dairy)

The CBC also welcomed the following new members and alternates to the council:

  • Lizette Cisneros, feeder alternate, Hanford
  • Frank Nunes, dairy member, Tulare
  • William Vanbeek, dairy member, Tipton
  • Frank Mendonsa, dairy alternate, Tulare

The CBC board is comprised of 42 members and alternates, each appointed by the California Secretary of Agriculture. Both the Executive Committee and the full council represent all segments of beef production within California, including range cattle, dairy cattle, feeders, packers/processers and the general public. A full list of the council is available here.

2022-02-02T10:53:41-08:00February 2nd, 2022|

California Milk Advisory Board Offers Opportunity for Student Ambassadors to Share California Dairy Messages With International Audiences

Two students to be selected to represent Real California Milk in Mexico

By Thalia Sillivan, CMAB

The California Milk Advisory Board announced that resumption of the student ambassador internship program in which students represent Real California Milk internationally. Applications are now open for college students to represent Real California Milk this summer in Mexico.

The interns, selected from students enrolled in agriculture-related programs at colleges and universities throughout the state, will be chosen based on academic achievement, connection to the dairy industry and a willingness to travel abroad and learn more about international dairy sales and marketing as well as a plan to work in the California dairy industry in the future.

Over the six-week period, interns will spend time with Imalinx, the CMAB marketing organization located in Mexico, in order to gain a better understanding of these markets, consumer buying habits and promotional efforts on behalf of California’s dairy industry.

“California accounts for more than 33 percent of all U.S. dairy exports, international trade continues to be essential for our continued growth. Over the last decade, the CMAB has worked closely with partners in Mexico to develop markets for California dairy products. This program is focused on providing insight into international dairy marketing for future leaders who will work in the dairy business and one day serve on dairy industry boards and lead industry groups,” said Glenn Millar, Director of International Business Development for the CMAB.

The goal of the CMAB International Internship program is to provide agriculture and dairy college students an opportunity to learn about dairy foods and marketing in the international marketplace. The program looks to develop leaders who will serve on dairy industry boards, work in dairy foods production, processing or sales and marketing.

Interested candidates must submit a completed application, essay, and other requirements by Tuesday, February 1, 2022. Additional information is available at:

www.californiadairypressroom.com/Press_Kit/California-Milk-Advisory-Board-International-Internship-Criteria-Guidelines-2022

California is the nation’s leading milk producer, and produces more butter, ice cream and nonfat dry milk than any other state. California is the second-largest producer of cheese and yogurt. California milk and dairy foods can be identified by the Real California Milk seal, which certifies they are made with milk from the state’s dairy farm families.

2022-01-14T14:22:26-08:00January 14th, 2022|

Lowering Cattle Emissions Part 1

Cattle Feed Additives Lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions

By Tim Hammerich with the Ag Information Network

Cattle are sometimes criticized for their contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, but a new seaweed-based feed additive could make a big difference. Ermias Kebreab, associate dean and professor of animal science at UC Davis, says their research is showing big drops in greenhouse gas emissions with certain feed additives.

“I have not seen any other additive that would reduce by as much as the seaweed that we had been working on. In this case, we’ve seen a reduction, anywhere between 50% to 80% or more,” said Kebreab.  “And it just depends on the substrate or what they have been fed. Those animals fed at the early stage with high forage high fiber, the reduction was more about 50% to 60%. And then when we go to more concentrate-based typical feedlot diets, then we see the reduction of over 80%.”

Kebreab said along with these drops in emissions, the research on the seaweed-based feed additives is also showing increases in efficiency.

“With the seaweed, for example, what we’ve seen was that there was a 20% increase in the feed conversion efficiency. So what this means is that for the same amount of feed that you give to the animals, you get an additional growth, additional meat, in this case, from the animal,” Kebreab said,

The cattle industry continues to find innovative ways to be more efficient and sustainable.

2021-04-15T16:06:06-07:00April 15th, 2021|

Ben Maddox Named Ag and Wine Executive with B of A

Bank of America Names Ben Maddox Western Food, Agriculture and Wine Executive

Bank of America is pleased to announce that Ben Maddox has been named Western Food, Agriculture, and Wine Executive.

Based in Fresno, Maddox and his team will continue to work with local growers, processors, wholesalers, and marketers to provide financing solutions to crop and dairy farmers, cattle ranchers, and feedlots, farm product processors (meat/dairy/produce), grain merchandisers, packaged foods, poultry, pork, and vintners.

Bank of America is one of the largest providers of financial services to the food and agribusiness sectors, with its industry-leading agribusiness group delivering end-to-end banking and finance solutions to agriculture producers and related businesses.

“Ben’s extensive experience providing credit to food and agriculture producers and processers and thorough understanding of the industry dynamics and cycles will position him to lead this critical multi-billion dollar western portfolio ranging from small family farms to global brands into the next decade,” said Kathie Sowa, global banking and markets executive, Central Valley.

Maddox will also continue in his role as Global Commercial Banking Market Manager for the Central Valley, serving companies with annual revenues of $50 million to $2 billion, providing a variety of financial solutions, including treasury, credit, investment banking, risk management, international and wealth management.

With more than 20 years of commercial banking experience, primarily in the Central Valley, Maddox joined Bank of America in 2014. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration with an option in Finance and a minor in Economics from California State University, Fresno, as well as Series 7, 63, and 24 certifications. Previously, Maddox served for 5 years in the U.S. Navy.  An active member of the community, Maddox currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes Central Valley Chapter and coaches youth softball and soccer.

2021-01-20T18:02:10-08:00January 20th, 2021|

Act Now to Help Pass the USMCA

House to Take First Step Towards Full Ratification of USMCA

Provided by California Farm Bureau Federation

This Thursday, the House will take the first step towards full ratification of the renegotiated NAFTA known as the “US-Mexico-Canada Agreement” (USMCA). California agriculture exports $6.6 billion in goods to Canada and Mexico and supports more than 56,000 jobs.
 
Since NAFTA was implemented, U.S. agricultural exports to Canada and Mexico quadrupled from $8.9 billion in 1993 to $39 billion in 2017. After President Trump renegotiated NAFTA, the International Trade Commission determined that the USMCA would have a positive impact on the U.S. economy and a positive impact on U.S. agriculture. An additional $2.2 billion in exports is expected once this agreement is ratified.
 
Congress must pass USMCA to preserve the proven successes of NAFTA while enjoying greater access to dairy, chicken, and eggs. The agreement has positive updates for fruit exports, improvements in biotechnology, protected geographical indications, and strengthened sanitary/phytosanitary measures.
 
All in all, the USMCA is needed to bring more stability to the volatile trade market. Please reach out today to your U.S. Representative to urge their YES vote on this important agreement.

Click Here: ACT NOW for USMCA House Passage

2019-12-25T14:06:59-08:00December 18th, 2019|

Robotic Dairies Saves on Labor

Robotics Slowly Coming Into California Dairy Barns

 By Patrick Cavanaugh, Editor

It’s all associated with labor shortages, and skills and dairies aim to do something about it by bringing in robotics into the milking parlor

“If you have 3,000 cows, robotics will be a huge investment; however, most of the data collected is for robots in smaller operations,” said Daniela Bruno, who earned a Veterinary Medicine degree in Brazil and then went to grad school at UC Davis. She is a UCANR Dairy Advisor for Fresno County. “Many dairies are interested in how the robots will work in their operation because of major labor shortages,” she said.

The robotic milking machines are stationary in the milking barn, and cows will walk in at an assigned amount of times per day. “I talk about large versus small operations, because each robot, can milk between 65 and 70 cows so that you would need a lot of robots for a 3,000 cow dairy,” Bruno said.

Robotic arm milks a cow.

As far as installing robots, the manufacturer has to come up with a plan. Sometimes they need to build a new barn.

Bruno noted that smaller dairies on the East Coast or Midwest  have many robots, but they’re smaller operations. “They have two or three robots per dairy, while the largest one, to my knowledge, is in Chile, which has 64 milking robots,” noted Bruno.

“But it’s growing in California, due to labor regulations and the number of hours that the workers can milk cows. Dairies are now thinking if they had robots, then they will have to worry less about all the labor issues,” she said.

Bruno described how these robots work, how the cows get to the robots for milking.

“The cows have a collar, and there are several sorting gates that lead to the robot. So let’s say the cow feels the urge to be milked, but the last time she was milked was less than four hours ago. She does not have the permission to be milked again,” noted Bruno. “The dairy can decide if they want the cows milked two, three, or four times a day,” she noted.

The permissions are based on the lactation stage or if she’s a heifer if she’s a first, a second lactation cow. They’re going to control it, and everything is stored in software. And when she approaches the gate, the gate is going to open for the cow if she’s allowed to go, or if she’s not going to be able to be milked yet, the cow is sent to a waiting place where she can rest and eat.

When a cow gets the permission, she walks into the robot milking machines, which will do everything that a dairy employee would do. “It prepares the cow, cleans the cow, and stimulates the cow, then the milking equipment is automatically put on the udders,” Bruno said. “And once the cow is done milking, it applies the post dipping sanitizer on the teat, and the cow is released to go back to its bedding area.”

Bruno said that the robots have many cameras, so they know exactly what they’re doing when they’re pre-treating the cow before milking and milking the cow and post treating the cow after the milking with sanitizer.

And while dairies will need less labor in the milking barn, there will still require employees to maintain the equipment, and there are several companies that offer that service, and prices vary.

“In California, I know of two dairies that have robots already. They’re both in Stanislaus County, and one of the dairies is planning to expand to 10 robots,” she said.

“The dairy operators are pleased to have the robots in place and feel that they could pay for themselves in short order,” Bruno said.

Bruno said she is working with dairy economic specialist Fernanda Ferreira at the  UC Davis research center in Tulare, where there is a project focused on the financial analysis of robots.

2021-05-12T11:17:08-07:00November 6th, 2019|
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