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California Dairy Innovation Center Offers Opportunities For Cheese Education

2022 Dairy Short Course Programs and Conference Schedule Released

By California Milk Advisory Board

The California Dairy Innovation Center announced the latest list of short courses which will be offered this year in collaboration with the Pacific Coast Coalition and industry instructors. Dates for an inaugural Dairy Products, Processing, and Packaging Innovation Conference were also announced.

The Frozen Desserts Innovation short course will be held on June 28th and 29th at the Dairy Innovation Institute, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo with a focus on capturing consumer trends: sugar-free, lactose-free and high protein. The short course features both lectures, demonstrations and actual ice cream manufacture in the Cal Poly pilot plant and creamery. In addition, a sales and marketing educational segment will provide practical guidance to entrepreneurs, and established brands alike. Registration is open at: https://dairy.calpoly.edu/short-course-symposia

The Advanced Unit Operations short course will take place September 27-29. Designed for those working in dairy plants, this course delivers both theoretical and practical understanding and knowledge of pasteurization, separation, condensation, filtration systems, drying, as well as principles of food safety. Program and registration will open June 1.

The California Dairy Innovation Center, in collaboration with Cal Poly, The Dairy Business Innovation Initiative, Pacific Coast Alliance, and Fresno State will hold a first ever conference on Dairy Products Processing and Packaging Innovation in Shell Beach, Calif, October 12th-14th. Featuring both national and international speakers, the conference focuses on consumer-driven innovation and the latest technological advances. Program outline and registration is open at: https://dairy.calpoly.edu/short-course-symposia

California is the nation’s leading milk producer, and produces more butter, ice cream and nonfat dry milk than any other state. California is the second-largest producer of cheese and yogurt. California milk and dairy foods can be identified by the Real California Milk seal, which certifies they are made with milk from the state’s dairy farm families.

# # #

About the California Dairy Innovation Center
The California Dairy Innovation Center (CDIC) coordinates pre-competitive research and educational training in collaboration with industry, check-off programs, and research/academic institutions in support of a common set of innovation and productivity goals. The CDIC is guided by a Steering Committee that includes California Dairies Inc., California Dairy Research Foundation, California Milk Advisory Board, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Dairy Management Inc., Fresno State University, Hilmar Cheese, Leprino Foods, and UC Davis.

About Real California Milk/California Milk Advisory Board
The California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), an instrumentality of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, is funded by the state’s dairy farm families who lead the nation in sustainable dairy farming practices. With a vision to nourish the world with the wholesome goodness of Real California Milk, the CMAB’s programs focus on increasing demand for California’s sustainable dairy products in the state, across the U.S. and around the world through advertising, public relations, research, and retail and foodservice promotional programs. For more information and to connect with the CMAB, visit RealCaliforniaMilk.com, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

2022-05-20T08:38:10-07:00May 20th, 2022|

Pest Variability Poorly Understood

UC Davis Ecologist Daniel Paredes: Understanding Pest Variability Key to Managing Pest Outbreaks

Newly published research led by UC Davis ecologist Daniel Paredes suggests that pest abundances are less variable in diverse landscapes comprised of multiple crop types and patches of natural habitat.

“As a result, pest outbreaks are less likely in diverse landscapes,” said Paredes, who analyzed a 13-year government database of diversified landscapes encompassing more than 1300 olive groves and vineyards in Spain. The database documented pests and pesticide applications.

The paper, “The Causes and Consequences of Pest Population Variability in Agricultural Landscapes,” appears in the Ecological Society of America journal, Ecological Applications. Co-authors are UC Davis distinguished professor Jay Rosenheim of the Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Daniel Karp, associate professor, Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology.  The research is online at https://bit.ly/3a64WRN.

Pest variability: an understudied but critical topic
Although population variability is often studied in natural systems, the need for long-term pest population data collected across many farms has largely prevented researchers from studying pest variability in agricultural systems, said Paredes, a postdoctoral fellow in the Karp lab.

“However, understanding variability in agriculture is key to understanding when pest outbreaks are likely to occur,” Paredes said. “Farmers are really risk averse, with fear of very rare but severe pest outbreaks driving their decisions.  But huge datasets are needed to understand when outbreaks are likely to occur and better inform management.”

“We found that more variable pest populations are more likely to downgrade crop quality and induce catastrophic damages,” Paredes said. “For example, the likelihood that olive flies consume more than 20 percent of olive crops doubled when comparing the most versus the least volatile populations.”

What causes a pest population to be variable?
Having shown that more pest-population variability is more likely to cause problems for farmers, the researchers then set out to discover what farmers could do to manage variability.

One key factor that emerged was the type of landscape the crops were grown in, specifically whether the landscape was dominated by vast fields of a single crop variety or more diversified. Pest populations were both more abundant and more variable in crop monocultures.

However, while landscape type influenced both pest population sizes and variability, this was not always the case for other variables. “This research shows that the factors that promote high overall mean pest density are not necessarily the same factors that promote high variability in pest density,” Rosenheim said. “So, mean densities, which is what researchers have been studying for decades and decades, are only part of the story.  Variation in density, and in particular unpredictable severe outbreaks, need to be studied separately.”

The take-away message?

“In Spain, planting multiple crops and retaining natural habitats would help stably suppress pests and prevent outbreaks,” said Paredes, a native of Spain who holds a doctorate in environmental sciences (2014) from the University of Granada. “Diversifying agricultural may be a win–win situation for conservation and farmers alike.”

“Therefore, we encourage agricultural stakeholders to increase the complexity of the landscapes surrounding their farms through conserving/restoring natural habitat and/or diversifying crops,” the researchers wrote in their abstract.

Tapping into other large datasets such as this one, will be key to understanding whether diversified landscapes also help mitigate pest variability and outbreaks in other areas, they said.

This project was funded by the National Science Foundation with funds from the Belmont Forum via the European Biodiversity Partnership: BiodivERsA. It was also supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

2022-05-19T13:47:29-07:00May 19th, 2022|

Community Members Invited to Support Favorite UC ANR Programs May 19-20

By Pam Kan-Rice, UCANR

California farmers can grow crops with less water. Gardeners can control pests with safer methods. Community members can take steps to protect their homes from wildfire. Children can learn life and work skills. Families can stretch their food dollars to provide nutritious meals. Californians have benefited from University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources research and outreach in many ways. And thanks to the state’s historic boost to UC ANR funding, more UC Cooperative Extension scientists and educators are being hired to address the unique needs of communities across California.

From noon to noon on May 19-20, the public is invited to donate for UC ANR Giving Day, sponsored by Tri Counties Bank, to enhance their favorite UC ANR projects or programs. 

The 24 hours of giving will expand UC ANR outreach to benefit the health and well-being of more Californians throughout the state.

In the past, donations have been used to fund UC Master Gardener demonstration gardens, purchase teaching supplies for California Naturalists, and fund scholarships for children to develop life and work skills in UC ANR’s 4-H programs.

Donors are invited to give to UC Cooperative Extension in their counties, Research and Extension Centers and favorite programs. When visitors click “GIVE” on the upper right of the website http://donate.ucanr.edu/givingday, fund choices appear in drop-down menus. 

Online gifts made between noon on May 19 and 11:59 a.m. on May 20 may help programs qualify for prize challenge awards. Donations can be made at http://donate.ucanr.edu/givingday.

If you prefer sending a check instead of donating online, please make checks payable to “UC Regents” and specify the fund, then mail to UC ANR Gift Processing, 2801 Second Street, Davis, CA 95618.

UC Agriculture and Natural Resources brings the power of UC to all 58 California counties. Through research and Cooperative Extension in agriculture, natural resources, nutrition, economic and youth development, our mission is to improve the lives of all Californians. Learn more at ucanr.edu and support our work at donate.ucanr.edu.

2022-05-17T12:07:18-07:00May 17th, 2022|

Calgren Diary Fuels Recognized for Sustainability in Industry

California Milk Advisory Board, California Dairy Research Foundation and California Dairy Quality Assurance Program Present 2nd California Dairy Sustainability Partnership Award to Calgren Dairy Fuels

Calgren recognized for Leadership in Sustainable Partnerships in Support of Climate-Smart Dairy Practices at 3rd California Dairy Sustainability Summit

TRACY, Calif. —April 28, 2021 —The California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB) announced the winner of its 2nd California Dairy Sustainability Award – Calgren Dairy Fuels, LLC. – in recognition of its partnership with Maas Energy Works, Inc. to create a 22-mile dairy digester pipeline cluster to efficiently collect dairy biogas from California dairy farm partners and upgrade and inject it into a utility pipeline owned by Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas).

The award was presented by CMAB during the 3rd California Dairy Sustainability Summit, in partnership with the California Dairy Research Foundation (CDRF) and California Dairy Quality Assurance Program (CDQAP). The Calgren project was the first in California to upgrade dairy biogas for utility pipeline injection and the largest collective dairy biogas operation in the U.S.15 California family dairy farms are participating in the first phase of the project, which makes compressed natural gas available as fuel for heavy duty trucks, replacing diesel – effectively removing 150,000 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) greenhouse gases from the environment and displacing more than 23 million gallons of fossil fuel-based transportation fuel annually.

“Projects like the Calgren Dairy Fuels cluster project demonstrate how powerful partnerships can be in moving the needle on our sustainability goals as an industry. We’re very proud of the efforts of Calgren Dairy Fuels, Maas Energy, and the California dairy farm families who have made tremendous progress in reducing their environmental footprint through planet-smart farming practices,” said John Talbot, CEO of the CMAB.

“We congratulate Calgren Dairy Fuels, Mass Energy Works and their dairy farm partners in the development of this tremendous project and receipt of this award. Their project truly highlights the environmental sustainability progress and benefits that can be achieved through cross sector partnerships. It assists the dairy industry as well as the state in meeting challenging methane reduction targets,” said Denise Mullinax, Executive Director, California Dairy Research Foundation. “We look forward to additional innovative projects as California continues to lead the nation in sustainable dairy production.”

Calgren Dairy Fuels’ 22-plus miles of underground pipeline link 12 dairies that send biogas from on-farm digesters – and two additional dairies that haul biomethane via tube trailers – to its centralized conditioning facility in Pixley, Calif. An additional dairy supplies manure slurry to a digester at the Calgren conditioning facility for biogas production. After upgrading this dairy biogas, Calgren injects it into a utility pipeline owned by SoCalGas – the nation’s largest natural gas distribution utility. This dairy-sourced renewable compressed natural gas (R-CNG) is made available as fuel for heavy duty trucks, replacing 3 million gallons of existing fossil-fuel diesel with near-zero emissions from CNG engines.

Each year, 150,000 tons of (CO2e) greenhouse gasses are captured from more than 70,000 cows and heifers. Additionally, more than 75 full-time equivalent jobs have been supported, and more than 18 miles of additional pipeline are under construction to double the number of dairies in the cluster.

“We appreciate the recognition and support for this dairy cluster project that is not only letting us back out of fossil fuel but also avoid methane that would otherwise end up in the atmosphere.” said Lyle Schlyer, president of Calgren Renewable Fuels. “We’re bringing our 16th cluster connected dairy online with several more right around the corner. We are also injecting trucked biomethane from an additional three dairies, with more trucked projects to come online.”

California is the nation’s leading milk producer, and makes more butter, ice cream and nonfat dry milk than any other state. California is the second-largest producer of cheese and yogurt. California milk and dairy foods can be identified by the Real California Milk seal, which certifies they are made with milk from the state’s dairy farm families.

2022-05-17T09:54:38-07:00May 17th, 2022|

Hoobler, Machado Join Farm Land Trust Board

Bill Hoobler and Mike Machado Appointed to California Farmland Trust’s Board of Directors

California Farmland Trust is proud to introduce well-respected industry professionals and community members, Bill Hoobler and Mike Machado, as new board members.

Hoobler and Machado have been active supporters of CFT for several years and bring a wealth of institutional knowledge and deep-rooted passion to the organization.

“Bill and Mike both offer a talented skillset and valuable expertise to the board, and their combined knowledge in policy and finance will be tremendous additions to our organization,” said Charlotte Mitchell, executive director at California Farmland Trust. “We are thrilled to have such accomplished individuals join the board and look forward to working towards continued success, in service to our critical mission.”

Since 2018, Hoobler has served as a CFT committee member and dedicated his professional life to the agriculture industry. He worked in the Farm Credit system for over 39 years, specializing in lending and crop insurance, before retiring in 2016 and starting his own crop insurance agency in Patterson.

“Being involved with CFT since 2018 has been rewarding,” Hoobler said. “California farmland needs to be protected and CFT is just one way to assure that farmland will remain farmland, forever.”

Machado, a Linden native, grew up on his family’s over-100-year-old farming operation and returned to the family business after serving in Vietnam. Machado also served 14 years to the California State Legislature, where he focused on water, banking, insurance, and budget accountability. In 2015, Machado and his family placed an agricultural conservation easement on their family farm, and later in 2021, Mike protected an additional two parcels.

“Without agriculture, we don’t eat,” Machado said. “Without farmland, we don’t have agriculture. That is why the work of California Farmland Trust is so important.”

Hoobler and Machado join the existing 11 members of CFT’s board of directors and will both serve on the Budget, Finance, and Risk Management committee.

2022-05-09T11:13:42-07:00May 9th, 2022|

Almond Acreage Increases in 2022 but Pace of Growth Slows

Bearing almond orchards at harvest will cover 1.338 million acres across California, an increase of 29,000 acres

 

By Almond Board of California

California’s almond acreage continues to grow, but at a gradually slowing rate, according to two new reports released today. While the number of almond orchards removed also increased over the previous year, it was not enough to offset the overall acreage gains.

According to an estimate from Land IQ, bearing almond orchards at harvest will cover 1.338 million acres across California, an increase of 29,000 acres – or about 2.2% – over last year. This estimate looks at orchards that will be productive and harvested in 2022. In addition, the report estimates 59,732 acres of orchards will be removed before harvest, nearly 12,000 acres more than last year.

These estimates from Land IQ’s 2022 Standing Acreage Initial Estimate look at bearing acreage – orchards that have matured enough to produce a crop – for the current 2021-22 crop year. In addition, the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA-NASS) 2021 California Almond Acreage Report released April 28, gives a comprehensive look at last year.

The USDA-NASS report for the 2020-21 crop year estimated there were 1.32 million bearing acres in 2021, up 5.6 percent from 2020. Total almond acreage in 2021, which includes non-bearing trees, was estimated at 1.64 million, up 2.5 percent from the previous year. It also said the 320,000 non-bearing acres in 2021 is a total down 8.6% from 2020.

The USDA-NASS report gave a preliminary estimate for bearing acreage in 2022 at 1.37 million acres, but cautioned that a major source of data for this estimate is a survey mailed to growers and is unlikely to be 100 percent accurate.

USDA-NASS said nonpareil continued to be the leading variety, followed by Monterey, Butte, Carmel, and Independence.

These reports are being issued side by side by the Almond Board of California (ABC) to provide a complete picture of California’s almond acreage.

Neither of these reports offer any estimate on the actual almond yield this 2021-22 crop year. The first look at yield will come on May 12 with USDA-NASS’ Subjective Estimate. A fuller picture of crop size will come with USDA-NASS’ Objective Report in July.

Bearing acres reflect plantings from 2019 or earlier. The removal estimates cover orchards taken out beginning in 2021 through March 31, 2022, added to acreage projected to be removed through Aug. 31, the end of the crop year. The projection uses historical data and present conditions.

“These estimates show that California almond production will remain strong,” said ABC President and CEO Richard Waycott. “Demand for almonds in California, the U.S. and around the globe continues to grow and California almond growers are prepared to meet that demand.”

Land IQ’s Initial Estimate and its Final Acreage Estimate in November, along with USDA-NASS’s April Acreage Report, May’s Subjective Estimate and the Objective Report in July are all commissioned by ABC to provide statistical transparency and a robust picture of California almonds to industry stakeholders around the world.

In 2018, ABC first commissioned Land IQ, a Sacramento-based agricultural and environmental scientific research and consulting firm, to develop a comprehensive, living map of California almonds. The map is the result of nearly a decade of research and has an accuracy of 98% or greater.

Data for USDA-NASS’s acreage reports comes from a number of sources including voluntary responses from almond growers’ to mailed questionnaires with telephone and field follow-ups. USDA-NASS also uses Land IQ data to fine tune its reports.

2022-05-05T10:07:34-07:00May 5th, 2022|

Port Delays Worsen as Harvest of New Crops Approaches

By Ching Lee,  AgAlert

As ongoing port congestion and persistent shipping obstacles continue to block movement of California agricultural goods, farmers and exporters face bulging warehouses and dwindling cash flow that threaten to sink some businesses.

Tree nuts, fresh produce, dairy products and other California farm commodities struggle to find rides on vessels and containers in which to ship them, with ocean carriers rushing to set sail empty rather than hauling agricultural exports.

“We have 50 loads packed and ready to ship, that customers would take tomorrow, that we can’t get on the ship,” said Bill Carriere, a Glenn County walnut grower and handler.

Agricultural exporters say their shipping problems—which trace to pandemic-related supply-chain disruptions that started in 2020—have only gotten worse. More shipping companies have notified them that they won’t stop at the Port of Oakland to pick up containerized farm products, which account for 60% of total exports through the port. The companies opt instead to return ships directly to Asia following long delays in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

Only one ocean carrier—Mediterranean Shipping Co.—so far has committed to servicing the Port of Oakland, said Roger Isom, president and CEO of the Western Agricultural Processors Association and California Cotton Ginners and Growers Association.

The Northern California port saw 67,910 empty containers leave its shores during the first two months of this year. That’s compared to 37,263 empties during the same time in 2020, according to a letter that agricultural groups, including the California Farm Bureau, sent to the Biden administration last week. The letter further noted that three out of four containers at U.S. ports return to Asia empty.

Because ships continue to bypass the Oakland port, exporters say the opening in March of a new “pop-up” yard for pickup of empty containers has offered limited relief. The temporary hub, located offsite of the port, allows shippers to stage export loads while avoiding busy marine terminals where most empty containers are stored.

As of last week, there were more than 500 containers in the yard, said port spokesman Robert Bernardo. The port saw 83 ships stopping in Oakland in March, compared to 93 a year ago. Reduced vessel arrivals were due in part to a COVID-related port shutdown in Shanghai, the port said.

Though the port has enough empty containers to cover current demand, Bernardo said supplies remain “in constant flux.” He said he expects inventory to tighten as imports from China begin to resume.

Aside from dealing with a shortage of containers, agricultural shippers say they struggle to secure bookings, which often get canceled or “rolled,” meaning the cargo wasn’t loaded onto the scheduled vessel, usually because there’s no room.

To read more, click here.

2022-05-04T12:14:43-07:00May 4th, 2022|

Westlands Water District awarded $7.6 Million Grant by the California Department of Water Resources

Grant Funds Will Help Create Drought Resilience, Increase Investment In Recharge Projects, and Drive Regional Groundwater Sustainability

 Today the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) awarded Westlands Water District, which serves as the Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA) for the Westside Subbasin, a $7.6 million grant as part of the Department’s Sustainable Groundwater Management (SGM) Proposition 68 Implementation Grant Program. This grant provides critical investment in the District’s efforts to ensure a sustainable groundwater basin.
“As we enter the third year of historic drought, Westlands remains committed to utilizing the most proactive, innovative, and scientifically-sound strategies in groundwater management,” said Tom Birmingham, general manager of Westlands. “This grant funding from DWR will be instrumental to the District’s implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act and to achieving groundwater sustainability. We are grateful for the support and investment in these vital projects.”
The grant funding will further three key efforts within the Subbasin: the Storage Treatment Aquifer Recharge (STAR) Program, Phase 1; the Westside Subbasin Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) 5-year Update; and the Westside Subbasin Geophysical Investigation for Recharge Potential.
The STAR Program will establish a network of treatment and aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) facilities in the Westside Subbasin. These facilities will treat water from the unconfined upper aquifer and provide temporary storage of surplus supplies. Based on current design, each treatment facility could treat up to 10,000 acre-feet a year and each ASR well could inject up to 1,200 gallons per minute to be stored for later use. Phase 1 of the STAR Program includes planning and identification of locations for the treatment facilities.
The funding will also support the District’s 5-year review and update of the Westside Subbasin GSP. This update enables the District to assess the implementation of the GSP and incorporate the latest information on groundwater conditions, technology, and science. The 2025 update will reflect progress towards achieving the Westside Subbasin 2040 sustainability goals, key groundwater project, and SGMA regulations compliance.
Lastly, the grant provided by DWR will also provide funding for the Westside Subbasin Geophysical Investigation for Recharge Potential. This Investigation consists of conducting geotechnical examinations on lands within the Westside Subbasin to identify groundwater recharge potential. The data collected will help interested parties, such as growers and/or the District, determine if a proposed site is feasible for groundwater
2022-05-03T11:03:46-07:00May 3rd, 2022|

Fresno County Farm Bureau Recognizes Journalists


FCFB Celebrates Agricultural Champions and Journalistic Excellence

After a two-year hiatus, Fresno County Farm Bureau held its third annual “Bounty of Fresno County” celebration on Thursday, April 28, at Wolf Lakes Park in Sanger.

Fresno County Sheriff-Coroner Margaret Mims was recognized with the FCFB “Friends of the Family Farm Award” for her vigorous support and contributions to Fresno County agriculture and rural communities. Sheriff Mims has served as the 25th Fresno County Sheriff-Coroner since November of 2006 and is now finishing up her final year of service.

Additionally, FCFB announced the winners of the 28th annual Journalism Awards.

Serving as judges for the Journalism Awards were Fresno Chamber of Commerce Chief Operating Officer Amy Fuentes; California Cotton Ginners & Growers Association and Western Agricultural Processors Association’s Assistant Vice President Priscilla Rodriguez; and FCFB President Daniel Hartwig.

Award winners received the coveted FCFB tractor trophy, which was generously donated by Kuckenbecker Tractor Company.

The criteria for the awards were: thorough and objective coverage of issues, given time and space limitations; educational element for the agriculture industry or the consumer; and portraying the personal stories of those who make up the food and agriculture industry, making issues relevant to consumers and Valley residents.

Audio

Patrick Cavanaugh, Ag Information Network, “Initial Zero Allocation Is Part of Massive Decline in Water Availability,” February 2022.

Farm Trade Print

Todd Fitchette, Western Farm Press, “Rice Fields Benefit Endangered Salmon,” January 2022.

General Print

Edward Smith, The Business Journal, “Growers, Experts Say Conventional Wisdom Around Drought is Flawed,” June 2021.

Video

Aurora Gomez/Reuben Guerra, ABC30, “Children First: Firebaugh High School’s FFA program,” September 2021.

“Heavy Puller Award”

18THIRTY Entertainment was recognized with the FCFB “Heavy Puller Award” for their many shows featuring agriculture including American Grown: My Job Depends on Ag, Tapped Out, Silent Sacrifice, and the Creek Fire documentary.

2022-05-04T12:10:00-07:00May 2nd, 2022|

New UCANR Extension Specialist Coming

UC ANR to recruit 16 new UC Cooperative Extension Specialists

 

By Pam Kan-Rice, UCANR Assistant Director, News and Information Outreach

University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources will be recruiting 16 new UC Cooperative Extension Specialists over the next 12 months. This is in addition to the five UCCE Specialist positions released for recruitment last fall and two co-funded UCCE Specialist positions since May 2021 – one in partnership with UC Merced and another with UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

To date, 106 UCCE Specialist and Advisor positions have been released since spring 2021, thanks to increased 2021-22 state funding. The positions are located in communities across California.

“We are positioned to make an even bigger difference in the lives of Californians by having so many more boots on the ground,” said Glenda Humiston, UC vice president for agriculture and natural resources.

UCCE Specialists perform research on campus with other campus-based academics and in the field with UCCE Advisors, who work directly with farmers, families and other Californians.

Currently UC ANR has UCCE Specialists located on six campuses – UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Riverside, UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz and UC Merced – at UC ANR’s research and extension centers and in county offices.

“We are excited to strengthen partnerships with additional UC campuses by placing UCCE Specialists at UC Irvine and UCLA for the first time,” Humiston said. “We are also adding a position in UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health.”

The new UC Cooperative Extension Specialist positions are listed below:

  • Agricultural Toxicology Specialist, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine Molecular Biosciences and CAES Department of Environmental Toxicology
  • Agroecology Specialist, UC Santa Cruz Center for Agroecology and Department of Environmental Studies
  • Climate Resilience and Labor Specialist, UC Berkeley School of Public Health
  • Dairy Cattle Production Health and Management Economics Specialist, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine Teaching & Research (located in Tulare County)
  • Diseases of Nursery Greenhouse and Native Crops Specialist, UC Davis Department of Plant Pathology
  • Economics of Diversity and Equity Specialist, UC Berkeley Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics
  • Economics of Food Supply Chains Specialist, UC Davis Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics
  • Engineered Wood Products and Design Specialist, UC Berkeley Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management
  • Food Crop Safety Specialist, UC Riverside Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology
  • Nutrition and Health Equity Specialist, UC Davis CAES Department of Nutrition
  • Regenerative Agriculture Specialist, UC Merced Department of Life and Environmental Sciences
  • Soil Health Specialist, UC Davis Department of Land, Air and Water Resources
  • Subtropical Fruit Crop IPM Specialist, UC Riverside Department of Entomology
  • Urban Water Quality, Health and Justice Specialist, UC Irvine Department of Civil and Environment Engineering
  • Water Equity and Adaptation Policy Specialist, UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation
  • Weed Science Specialist, UC Riverside CNAS Department of Botany and Plant Sciences

The full list of UCCE positions released is posted on the 2021-22 Release of UCCE Positions web page. More about the process is available on the 2021 Call for Positions web page.

All UC ANR jobs open for recruitment can be found at https://ucanr.edu/About/Jobs.

2022-05-02T15:00:43-07:00May 2nd, 2022|
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