Federal Dietary Committee Recommends 3 Daily Servings of Dairy

Dairy in Healthy Foods Category with Fruits, Veggies, Legumes, Whole Grains

 

 The International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) released the following statement recently:

“Today, members of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) confirmed dairy products should maintain a central, important role in federal nutrition recommendations for people beginning at a very early age. In addition to maintaining three servings of dairy per day, the committee found strong evidence pointing to positive health outcomes from dairy foods. In fact, a diet including low-fat and fat-free dairy, legumes, whole grains, fruits and vegetables is considered the ideal, healthy dietary pattern for all ages.

 

“In other key findings from their draft scientific report presented today, the DGAC highlighted new evidence strengthening dairy’s role in maintaining bone health for adults. For mothers, the committee dispelled misinformation about dairy’s link to asthma, saying there is no association between a mother’s consumption of dairy and the development of asthma in children.

And a new topic introduced in these Dietary Guidelines lays the groundwork for clearer nutrition recommendations for children from birth through 24 months of age, with the experts recommending small amounts of some foods including dairy foods, alongside fruits and vegetables, nut and seed products, and whole grain products, beginning at 6-12 months and continuing thereafter.

For toddlers, dairy foods are particularly important for the vitamins and nutrients they provide. This recommendation could not be clearer, demonstrating what the American Academy of Pediatrics has stressed for years, that dairy plays a critical role in the diet of children to bolster long-term health.

“Once again, the committee found no linkage between consumption of dairy foods and incidences of breast cancer, which should put an end to a longstanding disinformation campaign to alarm and confuse the public.

“IDFA is disappointed that the reported outcomes today did not include a mention of relevant scientific studies which show the benefits of dairy at each fat level. There is robust evidence to support the inclusion of dairy foods at all fat levels in recommended food patterns. With the DGAC’s role coming to an end, IDFA encourages USDA and HHS to remedy this oversight in the final guidelines to be released this year. 

“The conclusions offered today by the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee firmly establish dairy as one of the most nutritionally beneficial foods in dietary patterns alongside fruits and vegetables, legumes, and whole grains. IDFA is pleased to see federal nutrition guidance continue to affirm the important nutritional contributions made by dairy foods and remind Americans that a healthy diet includes three daily servings of dairy.”

 

Helping Dairy Operators Protect Groundwater

UCCE Advisor Helps Dairy Operators Strike a Delicate Balance to Protect Groundwater

 

By Jeannnette Warnert, Communications Specialist, UCANR

UC Cooperative Extension advisor Nick Clark is helping farmers in Fresno, Kings and Tulare counties.

Over the last 20 years, UC research has shown that dairies in the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys are potentially major contributors of nitrate and salts in groundwater. To maintain the quality of this irreplaceable natural resource, the California Water Resources Control Board has ramped up regulations to ensure that diary manure and wastewater application isn’t contaminating the aquifer.

UC Cooperative Extension advisor Nick Clark is helping farmers in Fresno, Kings and Tulare counties work through the process and continue producing crops sustainably now and in the future. He was hired in 2015 as the agronomy and nutrient management advisor, a title that reflects the importance of understanding the nutrient cycle and extending information to producers. Three other UCCE advisors are also focused on nutrient management.

Clark is working with dairy farmers who are producing crops to feed their herds, as well as farmers who are producing agronomic crops – such as silage corn, forage sorghum, wheat, triticale, alfalfa, rye and oats – to sell to dairies.

“These farmers operate under the microscope of several agencies for complying with environmental regulations and ordinances,” Clark said. Clark informs growers about the fate of nutrients in plants and soil and rules in place to protect water quality, helping them stay in compliance with government regulations. “Water quality regulations are becoming more strict, more complex and more specific.”

At the same time, some of the finer details about nutrient availability are not yet well understood.

Working closely with Luhdorff and Scalmanini Consulting Engineers, a groundwater engineering and consulting firm, Clark and colleagues have set up research trials on four commercial dairies in the San Joaquin Valley and one semi-research dairy farm to replicate a variety of treatments.

“The idea is to take a much closer look at nitrogen cycling in soil and plants to develop precise data about when plant development allows the crop to take up nitrogen,” Clark said. “The nitrogen application needs to be made so it is in the form plants need when the plants can use it. Otherwise, there is an increased chance it can percolate below the root zone and, eventually, into groundwater.”

Nutrient cycling involves advanced science. The majority of nitrogen content of manure is bound up in an organic molecule, which is not plant available. Plants only take up mineral forms of nitrogen – ammonium or nitrate. When the manure is in the soil, its chemistry changes. Timing by which this happens, Clark said, is extremely variable. Composition of manure, air and soil temperature, soil moisture, and soil microbiota all come into play.

“The research is trying to elicit information for Central Valley dairy farmers as to the best time, best rate and methods of application in order to fertilize crops without losing nitrogen to the groundwater,” Clark said.

Another factor that dairy farmers will have to consider is the implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act. The law, passed by the California Legislature during the 2011-2016 drought, creates local agencies to monitor groundwater extraction and bring that into balance with groundwater replenishment.

Diary operators are facing these new groundwater quality and quantity regulations at the same time new pressures from climate change are impacting their operations. Clark and his colleagues are also addressing climate change mitigation, adaption and resilience.

“We are looking into alternative feed crops for dairies that might help reduce the amount of irrigation water required to grow crops without sacrificing animal nutrition and milk yield,” Clark said.

One promising option is sorghum. UC Cooperative Extension scientists Jennifer Heguy, Jeffery Dahlberg and Deanne Meyer have been collecting data for a number of years on the crop’s nutritional value and impact on milk yield. Another potential feed crop is climate-resilient sugar beets.

“Sugar beets have been used in other parts of the United States and the world as cattle feed, but not as much in the San Joaquin Valley,” Clark said.

He is working with UC Cooperative Extension agronomy specialist Steven Kaffka and UCCE animal science specialist Peter Robinson to refine knowledge about sugar beet production under Central California conditions.

“Sugar beets grow readily in the winter in California, so we can take advantage of winter rainfall and a low irrigation requirement. That may help mitigate climate change impacts,” Clark said.

Climate change mitigation may also be achieved on dairy farms by modifying manure application timing and procedure. Applications of manure to cropland has an impact on emission of nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Reducing the amount of manure applications on cropland and incorporating manure solids into the soil may be ways for dairy farmers to reduce their facilities’ greenhouse gas emissions.

“We need to know a whole lot more to help farmers to stay in compliance and to deal with farming under new constraints,” Clark said. “Our research objectives are never static, because everything is shifting so quickly.”

New Officers Elected for Milk Advisory Board

Newly Elected:

California Milk Advisory Board 2020 Executive Committee Officers

Newly elected 2020 officers of the California Milk Advisory Board Executive Committee are (top row, left to right): Vice Chairman Tony Louters of Merced, Chairman Josh Zonneveld of Laton, Treasurer David Vander Schaaf of Stockton, Shown in the bottom row (left to right): Member-at-Large Essie Bootsma of Lakeview, Secretary Megan Silva of Escalon, Member-at-Large Kirsten Areias of Los Banos, and Member-at-Large Renae DeJager of Chowchilla.

 

 

San Joaquin County dairy producer, David Vander Schaaf, has been elected to serve as treasurer to the Executive Committee of the California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), the promotional arm of the state’s dairy farmers.

David is a fourth-generation dairy farmer at Vander Schaaf Dairy, which was established in 1929. David joined the family business in partnership with brothers Joey and James, as well as father John Vander Schaaf in 2013. He is a member of the Milk Producers Council.

Dairy producer Renae DeJager of Merced County has been re-elected as Member-at-Large to the Executive Committee of the California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), the promotional arm of the state’s dairy farmers.

Renae and husband Art are owners of 1500-acre Vista Verde Dairy, which was established in 1977 and where they currently milk 3,200 Holsteins. She is an active member of her community and serves a variety of community groups including California Women for AG, Stone Ridge Christian School Board and Cornerstone Community Church in Chowchilla. She previously served on the board for the U.S. Dairy Export Council and the National Dairy Promotion and Research Board where she traveled extensively to promote dairy in domestic and international markets.

Lakeview dairy producer Essie Bootsma has elected to serve as Member-at-Large to the Executive Committee of the California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), the promotional arm of the state’s dairy farmers.

Essie milks 2,000 Holsteins with her son Jason at the John Bootsma Dairy that she started with her husband, John, in 1979. She is a member of a variety of community groups, including the Western Riverside Ag Coalition, where she serves as secretary, the Eastern Municipal Water District Advisory Committee and the Eastern Municipal Dairy Water Supply, where she serves as chair. She previously served as Secretary to the CMAB’s Executive Committee. In her free time, Essie enjoys representing CMAB in promotional trade shows, spending time with her five grandchildren and cooking for and entertaining family and friends.

Fresno County dairy producer Josh Zonneveld has been re-elected to serve as Chairman of the Executive Committee of the California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), the promotional arm of the state’s dairy farmers.

Josh and his wife Cassie along with other family members currently milk 8,500 Holsteins at the 7,000-acre Zonneveld Dairies that his grandfather founded in 1968. He joined the family business in 2005. He is a member of the Ag Executive Council for Land O’ Lakes and also serves on the board for the California Dairy Research Foundation.

Dairy producer Kirsten Areias of Los Banos in Merced County, has been re-elected to serve as Member-at-Large to the Executive Committee of the California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), the promotional arm of the state’s dairy farmers.

Kirsten has been a dairy producer since 1980 and currently milks 320 Holsteins with husband Dennis at the 360-acre Den-K Holsteins, Inc. She is a member of a variety of industry groups, including Western United Dairyman, serves as an advisor for the California Holstein Association and Merced County Junior Holstein Association, and is a Dairy Bowl Coach.

Dairy producer Megan Silva of Escalon in San Joaquin County has been elected to serve as Secretary to the Executive Committee of the California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), the promotional arm of the state’s dairy farmers.

Megan graduated from Cal Poly in 2006 and is a 4th generation dairy farmer. Megan and husband Johnny Silva, along with her father Frank Rocha, currently milk 2100 Holsteins at the 900-acre Frank N. Rocha Dairy L.P., where she has worked since 2006. Megan and Johnny started their own dairy, R & S Dairy LLC. in May of last year. She is also extremely passionate about the fitness and wellness industries, and shares these passions through her two businesses in Escalon; EscalonFIT and Wellness by EscalonFIT.

Merced dairy producer Tony Louters has been re-elected to serve as Vice Chairman to the Executive Committee of the California Milk Advisory Board (CMAB), the promotional arm of the state’s dairy farmers.

Tony and his wife Corinna own T & C Louters Dairy in Merced where they currently milk 600 Holsteins. They have been in business since 2003 and have four children: Alexis, Bryce, Tyler and Breann. Tony is a member of Western United Dairymen.

California is the nation’s leading fluid milk producer and a leader in sustainable dairy practices. The state also produces more butter and nonfat dry milk than any other state and is the second-largest producer of cheese and yogurt. Dairy products made with California milk can be identified by the Real California Milk seal, which certifies that the products are made with milk produced on California dairy farms.

 

Former California Dairies CEO Is Honored

Andrei Mikhalevsky, Former President and CEO of California Dairies, Inc., Receives Inaugural IDFA Laureate Award

 

Andrei Mikhalevsky, former president and CEO of California Dairies, Inc., was greeted by a standing ovation and the acknowledgement of hundreds of his peers from across the dairy industry when he received the inaugural IDFA Laureate Award today during the association’s annual Dairy Forum in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Presented by the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), the IDFA Laureate Award is given to a leader in the dairy industry who has made significant, prolonged contributions to the development and growth of dairy. Candidates from across the dairy industry as well as suppliers and academics are eligible, and the awardee is chosen by a panel of industry professionals.

California Dairies Inc. (CDI) is the nation’s second largest dairy processing cooperative. Mr. Mikhalevsky was named president and CEO in November 2011 and began serving his term on Jan. 1, 2012, retiring at the end of 2019 after 8 years leading CDI.

Mr. Mikhalevsky’s career spans more than 40 years, and he has held a variety of leadership positions within the dairy industry. Previously, he served as the managing director of global ingredients and foodservices at Fonterra Cooperative Group Ltd., the world’s largest dairy exporter. Mikhalevsky built many of Fonterra’s global customer partnerships and oversaw the company’s research and innovation division and its branded business in Latin America. Prior to Fonterra, Mikhalevsky held executive positions at Campbell Soup Company, Georgia Pacific Corp. and Symrise Inc. He is a graduate of Stetson University where majored in finance and earned a Bachelor of Business Administration. In addition, he has attended the Food Executive Program at the University of Southern California.

 

Mr. Mikhalevsky currently serves as a director on the IDFA Executive Council and as chair of the IDFA Diary Ingredients Board.

“In selecting Andrei for this award, our panel recognized a true leader and innovator in the dairy industry, a professional who is respected by peers and competitors alike, and a partner and ally to anyone working on behalf of successful, sustainable dairy industry,” said Michael Dykes, D.V.M., president and CEO of IDFA.”

Dykes added, “For his service to our industry and to IDFA, we are proud to present Andrei Mikhalevsky with the very first IDFA Laureate Award.”

Consumers Prefer Dairy Milk over Other Plant Based Choices

Survey Says 86% of US Adults Prefer Dairy Milk

A new Morning Consult national tracking poll of 2,200 Americans points to a number of revealing consumer preferences for milk and related beverages. When given the option to choose among whole, reduced fat 2%, low fat 1%, skim, other (almond, soy, oat, other plant-based, lactose-free), or “do not consume” milk, respondents overwhelmingly chose 2% and whole milks because they believe they are most nutritious for themselves and their families. Further, 86% of U.S. adults prefer dairy milk over “other” beverages, including plant-based beverages.

Additionally, by a margin of more than 2-1, U.S. adults say it’s important to offer low-fat flavored milks with school meals; and by a 3-1 margin, U.S. adults say it’s important to offer 2% and whole milk with school meals. The poll was conducted by Morning Consult in partnership with the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA).

Poll Results

Here are 8 key findings:

1. A whopping 67% of adults across key demographics believe 2% and whole milk are the most nutritious types of milk. Thirty-six percent of adults believe 2% milk is the most nutritious, while 31% believe whole milk is the most nutritious.
2. At least 86% of adults prefer dairy milk compared to 10% who prefer “other” including plant-based beverages and lactose-free milk.
3. Strong opinions about offering flavored milk in schools vastly outweigh strong opinions against. Half of the adults believe it is important that the public school their child attends offers low-fat flavored milk with school meals, while just 22% believe it is unimportant. Twenty-nine percent have no opinion.
4. Adults feel similarly about fuller-fat milk with school meals—by a 3-1 margin, U.S. adults say it’s important to offer 2% and whole milk with school meals: 53% believe it is important that milks like 2% and whole are offered in schools, while just 18% feel it is unimportant. Currently, only low fat 1% and skim milks are allowed in schools.
5. Overall, more women than men believe it is more important that their children have access to fuller-fat and flavored milks in school.
6. Forty-two percent of SNAP participants prefer whole milk for themselves or their families. SNAP participants also report that they believe whole milk is the most nutritious (46%), the only demographic to do so. Of the 2,200 respondents, 336 self-identified as SNAP participants.
7. Respondents with incomes under $50,000 (inclusive of 336 SNAP and 115 WIC participants, respectively, who self-identified) believe more strongly than those with higher incomes (above $50,000) that fuller-fat milks are most nutritious and prefer offering these options as well as low-fat flavored milks in schools for their children.
8. Variety is key: More than three-quarters (77%) of adults found it important to have a variety of options to choose from when purchasing types of milk.

Cheese From CA Bring Home Awards

They Earn 50 Awards at American Cheese Society Competition in Richmond, VA

 Cow’s milk cheese and dairy processors that use the Real California Milk seal brought home 50 awards from the 2019 annual cheese competition held by the American Cheese Society (ACS), July 31-August 3, 2019 in Richmond, Va. 

The American Cheese Society recognizes the finest cheeses and dairy products made in the Americas. A total of 1742 cheese and cultured dairy products were entered the competition. Cheeses made with 100% California cow’s milk had another strong showing this year in a field of 257 processors representing the United States, Canada, Columbia and Venezuela.

California cheesemakers won a total of 81 awards – the second largest showing in the competition – with Real California cow’s milk cheeses bringing home 50 prizes: 19 first-place, 20 second-place and 11 third-place awards in this year’s judging. Highlights from these wins include:

  • Marquez Brothers International, Inc., San Jose – 15 awards: 1st place each for Panela (Hispanic and Portuguese Style Cheeses), Crema Agria, Plain Stir Yogurt (Cultured Milk and Cream Products), Guava Drinkable Yogurt, Mango Drinkable Yogurt, Strawberry Banana Drinkable Yogurt, and Strawberry Drinkable Yogurt (Flavored Cheeses/Yogurts & Cultured Products with Flavor Added); 2nd place each for Jocoque (Cultured Milk and Cream Products), Queso Fresco Casero Cheese, Queso Fresco Cremoso Cheese (Hispanic and Portuguese Style Cheeses), Peach Drinkable Yogurt, Piña Colada Drinkable Yogurt, and Strawberry Banana Cereal Smoothie (Flavored Cheeses/Yogurts & Cultured Products with Flavor Added); and 3rd place each for Queso Cotija (Hispanic and Portuguese Style Cheeses) and Guava Stir Yogurt (Flavored Cheeses/Yogurts & Cultured Products with Flavor Added),
  • Karoun Dairies, Inc., Turlock – five awards: 1st place each for Brinza Feta (Feta – Cow’s Milk) and Masala Yogurt Dip (Flavored Cheeses/Yogurts & Cultured Products with Flavor Added); 2nd for Bulgarian Yogurt (Cultured Milk and Cream Products); and 3rd each for Whole Milk Yogurt and Armenian Yogurt (Cultured Milk and Cream Products).
  • Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., Pt. Reyes – five awards: 1st place each for Point Reyes Bay Blue (Blue Mold Cheeses), The Fork Pimento Cheese and The Fork Original Blue & Date Spread (Flavored Cheeses); and 3rd each for Point Reyes Toma (American Originals) and Point Reyes Tomaprovence (Flavored Cheeses).
  • Cowgirl Creamery, Petaluma – four awards: 2nd place each for Fromage Blanc (Fresh Unripened Cheeses), Pierce Point (Flavored Cheeses) and Mt. Tam (Soft Ripened Cheeses); and 3rd for Cottage Cheese (Fresh Unripened Cheeses).
  • Rizo-Lopez Foods Inc., Modesto – four awards: 1st place each for RBCC Oaxaca (Hispanic & Portuguese Style Cheeses) and RBCC Queso Cotija (Hispanic & Portuguese Style Cheeses – Ripened, Aged > 90 Days); and 2nd each for Cotija (Hispanic & Portuguese Style Cheese – Ripened, Aged > 90 Days) and RBCC Grilling Cheese (Hispanic & Portuguese Style Cheeses, Cooking Hispanic – Cheeses).
  • Sierra Nevada Cheese Company, Willows – four awards*: 1st place for Heroes Greek Yogurt (Cultured Milk and Cream Products); 2nd each for Crème Fraîche (Cultured Milk and Cream) and Russian-Style Fresh Farmer Cheese (Fresh Unripened Cheeses); and 3rd for Organic Traditional Jack (American Originals).
  • Oakdale Cheese & Specialties, Oakdale – three awards: 1st place for Aged Gouda (American Made/International Style); and 2nd each for Mild Gouda (American Made/International Style) and Cumin Gouda (Flavored Cheeses).
  • Bellwether Farms, Petaluma – two awards*: 1st place for Fromage Blanc (Fresh Unripened Cheeses) and 2nd for Plain Organic Cow Yogurt (Cultured Milk and Cream Products).
  • Cal Poly Creamery, San Luis Obispo – two awards: 1st place for Smoked Grand Gouda (Smoked Cheeses) and 3rd for Grand Gouda (American Made/International Style).
  • Nicasio Valley Cheese Company, Nicasio – two awards: 2nd place for San Geronimo (Washed Rind Cheeses) and 3rd for Foggy Morning with Garlic and Basil (Flavored Cheeses).
  • Central Coast Creamery*, Paso Robles: 2nd place Holey Cow (American Made/International Style).
  • Marin French Cheese Company, Petaluma – one award: 3rd place for Triple Crème Brie (Soft Ripened Cheeses).
  • Rogue Creamery*, Oregon: 2nd place for Organic Smokey Blue Cheese (Smoked Cheeses).
  • Rumiano Cheese Company, Crescent City – one award: 1st place for Dry Jack (American Originals).

In total, 14 cow’s milk cheese and dairy companies won awards for products made with 100% Real California milk from the state’s more than 1200 family dairy farms. California is the second largest cheese producing state in the nation, responsible for more than 2.5 billion pounds of cheese in 2017. Real California cheeses and dairy products can be found at retailers throughout the U.S., Mexico and Asia. For more information, visit: RealCaliforniaMilk.com. For more information on ACS competition winners and the ACS Conference, go to: cheesesociety.org.

* Bellwether Farms, Central Coast Creamery, Rogue Creamery and Sierra Nevada Cheese Company also received awards for cow’s milk and non-cow’s milk cheeses that do not carry the Real California Milk seal.

Calif. Dairy Organizations Collaborate Regarding Quota Program

Groups Launch Exploratory Effort to Solicit and Analyze Proposals

News Release

Recently, the United Dairy Families of California, California Dairies, Inc., Land O’Lakes, Inc., Dairy Farmers of America, and the STOP QIP organization announced a multi-phase process aimed at soliciting and analyzing industry input on California’s historic quota program.

Included in this process is a series of meetings, starting later this month, open to all dairy producers and interested parties. These meetings are intended to solicit various pathways for the state’s quota program.

1) This multi-phase process includes three key parts: The Think Tank, Producer Feedback, and Analysis.

2) The Think Tank phase is for information-gathering from various segments of the dairy industry. This will include the meetings identified below, where producers will be able to voice their opinion and contribute ideas or concepts.

3) The Producer Feedback phase will allow producers to comment and challenge the ideas developed in the Think Tank phase.

In the Analysis phase, dominant ideas from the Producer Feedback phase will be analyzed for economic impacts, and legal pathways to adoption will be determined.

This process will be implemented with the assistance of dairy industry economist Dr. Marin Bozic and dairy market analyst Matt Gould. Dr. Bozic and Mr. Gould will be conducting an economic analysis of the proposed ideas.

The first series of meetings associated with the Think Tank phase are as follows:

● Tuesday, July 30 – 2 pm to 4 pm – Embassy Suites, Ontario

● Wednesday, July 31 – 9 am to 11 am – Heritage Complex, Tulare

● Wednesday, July 31 – 2 pm to 4 pm – Turlock Ballroom

● Thursday, August 1 – 9 am to 11 am – Washoe House, Petaluma

Meeting space is limited. All participants are strongly encouraged to register at

www.dairyfamilies.org/events

Federal Milk Marketing Order in California in Effect Nov. 1

Questions Arise Regarding Milk Quota

Edited by Patrick Cavanaugh

Dairymen and women throughout California are working hard to provide milk and other dairy products for consumers in California and the world. Because the industry has struggled over the past decade with price swings that have often landed dairies in red, many dairies have gone out of business. Still, other operations relocated to others states where regulations are a fraction of what they are in California.

In June 2018, California dairy producers voted to establish a new Federal Milk Marketing Order (FMMO) for the state. The vote was a paramount step in a long process that would culminate with the new order taking effect on November 1. The order will adopt the same dairy product classification and pricing provisions currently used throughout the FMMO system.

California accounts for more than 18 percent of U.S. milk production and is currently regulated by a state milk marketing order administered by the California Department of Agriculture (CDFA). Once this new FMMO takes effect, more than 80 percent of the U.S. milk supply will fall under the FMMO regulatory framework.

Western United Dairymen is a trade association based in Modesto. Annie AcMoody is the Director of Economic Analysis. She explained that there have been questions from the industry regarding the upcoming FMMO.

Among the often asked question revolves around when the state switches to FMMO in November, what will happen to their quota if a dairy ships milk out of state?

Annie AcMoody: When our California state system goes away to make way for the Federal Milk Marketing Order (FMMO) in November, the Quota Implementation Plan (QIP) will be the language in place to ensure the quota system’s smooth transition into the FMMO system.

When we enter that new world, all market milk received from California producers at a California plant will be assessed for quota. By “received”, the language defines “to convey milk physically into a milk plant where it is utilized within the plant, or stored within such milk plant and transferred to another plant for utilization. This means that a milk truck driver cannot drive by a plant, wave hello to an operator, and keep on going out of state and still call this milk received in California. Basically, if your California milk leaves the state, you will not be assessed for quota.

But you also will not be paid for it. But, if your milk is 60% quota and only 40% of your milk goes out of state, you will be assessed on 60% of your milk and get paid quota on that same 60%. If your quota covers 100% of your milk and 40% of your milk goes out of state you will be assessed on 60% of your milk and get paid quota on that same 60%. In this instance, one could wonder if it makes much sense to keep your quota.

While it may not make much economic sense to hold on to quota you are not paid for, some reasons may validate that decision (perhaps it is expected milk will be shipped to a California plant in the near future). If you were to decide to hold on to that quota, it is important to keep in mind that “if quota is not made active by shipments of market milk to a California plant or cooperative association or is not transferred within the 60-day period, such quota shall revert to the Department”.

This excerpt from the QIP means that if your quota milk is not paid on for over 60 days, you will lose it, so you better sell it. This is likely going to be an issue if you ship to a proprietary plant and all your milk goes out of state. If you ship milk to a cooperative, there is more flexibility because that coop has the ability to combine quotas assigned to it by its members.

So as long as the quota total within the coop is not larger than the total amount of market milk produced and received in California, then there should be no issue for you as a quota holder.

What 
is 
defined 
as 
market 
milk?


Answer:
 Grade A milk.

If your milk is Grade B, you cannot have quota now and will not be able to under the QIP. You will not be assessed for it either. Currently, only around 3% of the milk in California is Grade B. WUD will keep an eye out on this topic to ensure that percentage does not deviate significantly. As a reassurance, this is not something that could grow from 3% to 50% in a month since fluid milk is not allowed to take in Grade B milk and the three largest coops in the state (CDI, DFA and LOL) committed to not taking in any more Grade B milk after the transition to the FMMO.

Hilmar Cheese Company Unveils Largest Dairy Mural in the U.S.

Scoop it Forward Event Collects Food for Hilmar Helping Hands 

News Release

Hilmar Helping Hands received thousands of food items on July 13 as part of a “Scoop it Forward” event to celebrate the official unveiling of the largest hand-painted dairy mural in the United States at the Hilmar Cheese Company Visitor Center.

Hilmar Cheese Company owners, employees, local officials and the community brought non-perishable food items to donate in exchange for a scoop of delicious ice cream made with Real California Milk as part of the mural celebration, which honors the partnership between the dairy industry and the local community.

“Dairy farm families are the backbone of many of our local communities,” said Jenny Lester Moffitt, California Department of Food and Ag Undersecretary. “But their impact goes well beyond that. They benefit the entire state—economically and by providing wholesome, affordable dairy foods.”

The mural is part of a national effort to celebrate the contribution of dairy farms and farm families to local communities. The Hilmar Cheese Company Visitor Center was selected by the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy as one of seven locations across the nation to feature a custom mural as part of the Undeniably Dairy campaign. Undeniably Dairy is an industry-wide, national campaign that aims to increase consumer trust in the practices, principles, and people behind the dairy foods people know and love.

Standing 32 feet tall by 60 feet wide, the mural is a creation of muralist Ed Trask of Richmond, Va. The mural creation used 22 gallons of paint and 273 different colors. It depicts the Hilmar Cheese Company’s founding principles of farmers, family, community and faith—and its passion for Jersey cows. It also depicts a child’s journey from experiencing the visitor center as a youth and showing cows to discovering her devotion to dairy and pursuing a career in dairy innovation and research.

“This mural represents our values and foundation,” said Jim Ahlem, chairman of the Hilmar Cheese Company Board of Directors. “We are grateful to our local communities, our employees, the wholesome dairy foods we produce, the next generation of agricultural leaders developed through 4-H and FFA, and of course, the dairy farm families who ship their milk to us and the Jersey cows that produce it.”

“We appreciate that we were selected as one of the mural locations,” added David Ahlem, CEO and President of Hilmar Cheese Company. “We have thousands of families and school children visit each year. It’s important that people understand where their food comes from, and we hope this mural will bring a new connection to dairy.”

Federal Milk Marketing in CA May Increase Prices

Federal Milk Marketing Order to Help CA Dairies

By Melissa Moe, Associate Editor

California is getting closer to being included in the federal milk marketing order. The state has been operating on its own state order for decades. Up until the past few years, most producers have been content in operating under a state system. However, recently California has been failing to keep up with prices that are being paid for milk in other parts of the country.

Rob Vandenheuval is the Manager of the Milk Producers Council, with offices in Ontario (CA), Bakersfield and Turlock. The Milk Producers Council is a nonprofit that represents the California dairy industry.

“We’ve made a lot of progress, and we’re looking forward to, hopefully, an announcement out of the USDA sometime early this year. The next step would be the first draft of what that order would look like and the opportunity for the industry to then comment on it,” Vandenheuval said.

Producers believe that inclusion in to the federal order is going to result in California producers getting a milk price that’s more in line with the prices that are paid all over the country. This level playing field will help producers compete in the national market.

“We’re competing. We’re not on an island. We are part of the U.S. National Domestic Dairy Industry, and we compete with dairy farmers in Arizona and Washington and Wisconsin and Florida and New York. So, we need to update our regulations that oversee our milk pricing to keep them in line with what’s going on in the rest of the country. Rather than try to mimic what the federal order’s doing, it seems prudent to actually join the federal order system,” Vandenheuval said.

However, inclusion into the Federal Milk Marketing order may still be a long way off. California’s inclusion may be many producers’ saving grace, but it may not come soon enough to save producers that are struggling to stay in business today.

“We’re not going to get on that level playing field we talked about with federal order until sometime in the 2018. There’s a lengthy process and a vote, and then, even once it’s implemented, once it’s approved, it has to be implemented here in California, so that is more than a year away before that all gets shaken out,” Vandenheuval said.

The end of 2016 saw milk prices in an upswing, and many producers are hopeful that the rise in prices may be enough to keep them in business for the time being.

“Feed costs have been modest, and so with some additional strength in the milk prices, I think we could at least see a 2017 that is profitable as opposed to what 2015 and 2016 represented,” Vandenheuval said.