Westlands Water District Statement on Initial CVP Water Allocation

Today the Bureau of Reclamation announced an initial allocation of 0% for Westlands Water District and other south-of-Delta Central Valley Project (CVP) irrigation contractors. This is the fourth time in the last decade the south-of-Delta irrigation contractors have received a 0% allocation. Despite significant precipitation in the fall and early winter, the 2021-22 water year is likely to be classified as dry. January and February were exceptionally dry. The District is disappointed with the allocation but is aware that hydrologic conditions, including low CVP reservoir storage conditions at the beginning of the water year and record low precipitation in January and February, and Reclamation’s obligation to meet Delta water quality and outflow standards imposed by the State Water Resources Control Board, prevent Reclamation from making water available under the District’s contract.

Within Westlands, the continued drought conditions in 2021 resulted in over 200,000 acres fallowed, countless lost jobs, and thousands of acres of food unharvested. The circumstances in 2021 and those facing us in 2022 demonstrate the need invest in infrastructure to better manage the State’s water resources, which includes increased capacity to capture water when its available for transport and use in times of drought. California needs new storage, both surface and groundwater, and improved conveyance facilities. The state must also establish effective water policies that enable adaptive management of the system to maximize the beneficial uses of water throughout the State. Despite the current lack of precipitation, the District is focusing on comprehensive approaches to ensure a sustainable water future.

In spite of the current drought, the District continues to plan, pursue, support, and implement regional and local projects to ensure a sustainable water future for the families that live and work in and around the District. And, as always, the District will look to the coming months with the hope of improved precipitation and an increased allocation.

2022-02-23T12:21:51-08:00February 23rd, 2022|

Congressman Valadao Statement on Bureau of Reclamation’s Central Valley Project Initial 2022 Water Allocation

Today, Congressman David G. Valadao released the following statement in response to the Bureau of Reclamation’s (Reclamation) initial 2022 water allocation announcement for Central Valley Project (CVP) contractors. Reclamation announced an initial allocation of 0% for South-of-Delta agricultural repayment and water service contractors. They also announced an initial allocation for Municipal and Industrial repayment and water service contractors of only 25% of their historic use.

“This unacceptably low water allocation is a devastating blow to small community agricultural producers throughout the Central Valley. The livelihoods of these people and our global food supply depend on the industry,” said Congressman Valadao. “The Central Valley farming community has endured drought conditions, burdensome regulations, and below adequate water allocations for years. This community is resilient, but the fact remains that our farms will not survive without a reliable water supply for South-of-Delta agriculture. This dire situation emphasizes the need for more storage capacity so we can capture water when we have surplus. California’s water supply allocations must reflect the needs of these farmers and producers so they can continue providing food for the nation. This is alarming and unwelcome news to communities that have continued to suffer from issues like the ongoing supply chain crisis.”

Central Valley agriculture contractors rely on meaningful allocations from Reclamation for their yearly planning. Central Valley farmers and communities have endured disproportionately low water allocations for many years, with contractors receiving well below their contracted supply even during wet years. As a lifelong dairy farmer, Congressman Valadao has experienced firsthand the challenges and frustrations surrounding this issue. He has consistently called for CVP allocations to reflect the needs of the agriculture community, the backbone of the Central Valley economy. Read more on Congressman Valadao’s work on California water issues here.

2022-02-23T11:38:17-08:00February 23rd, 2022|

Almond Board of California Announces 2022 Elections

By Almond Board of California

Elections for the Almond Board of California (ABC) Board of Directors have kicked off for the 2022-2023 crop year with the call to all candidates to file their petitions or declarations of candidacy by April 1, 2022.

There are two independent grower positions and one independent handler position on the ABC Board of Directors to be decided in voting that starts April 21 and ends May 26. Alternate seats for those spots are also open.

To be considered for an independent grower or alternate seat, candidates must be a grower and must submit a petition signed by at least 15 independent almond growers (as verified by ABC). Independent handler and alternate candidates must declare their intention in writing to ABC.

All petitions and declarations must state the position for which the candidate is running and be filed by mail with ABC at 1150 9th St., Suite 1500, Modesto, CA 95354. The deadline for all filings is April 1. Potential candidates who’d like more information can contact Toni Arellano at tarellano@almondboard.com.

“The ABC Board of Directors is such an important and vital part of our industry,” said ABC president and CEO Richard Waycott. “It guides the work of the Almond Board and is key to overseeing the welfare of the industry and of more than 7,600 growers and 100 handlers.”

The ABC board sets policy and recommends budgets in major areas, including marketing, production research, public relations and advertising, nutrition research, statistical reporting, quality control and food safety.

Getting involved provides an opportunity to help shape the future of the almond industry and to help guide ABC in its mission to promote California almonds to domestic and international audiences through marketing efforts, funding and promoting studies about almonds’ health benefits, and ensuring best-of-class agricultural practices and food safety.

ABC encourages eligible women, minorities and people with disabilities to consider running for a position on the Board of Directors to reflect the diversity of the industry it serves.

2022-02-18T08:33:15-08:00February 18th, 2022|

Real California Milk Spotlights Foodservice Innovation With 2022 Events For Professional Chefs

4th Annual Pizza Competition, CADairy2Go and Cal-Mex Invitational Events Showcase On-Trend Recipes and Techniques Using Real California Cheese and Dairy Products

By California Milk Advisory Board

The Foodservice Division of the California Milk Advisory Board today announced the kickoff date for the 4th Annual Real California Pizza Contest, the return of the CADairy2Go competition and the rollout of a new culinary event focusing on Cal-Mex to round out its foodservice events for 2022.

The 4th annual Real California Pizza Contest, a search for the best pizza recipes using cow’s milk cheeses from California, gets underway on March 1st. Professional chefs and pizzaiolos from throughout the U.S, can enter their innovative recipes from March 1 through April 24, 2022, for a chance to make it to the bake-off final on June 22, 2022, in Napa, Calif. and compete for up to $25,000 in prize money.

The CADairy2Go Invitational is inspired by chefs and foodservice operators who made quick, creative pivots to adjust their menus for the takeout and delivery model during the disruption caused by the pandemic. Now in its 2nd year, the event will feature culinary professionals representing a variety of foodservice backgrounds, such as major restaurant chains, independent restaurants, ghost kitchens and food trucks who will gather in October to compete for a chance at up to $5,000 for their innovative To-Go recipes.

The inaugural Cal-Mex Invitational, scheduled for August, captures creations from chefs who specialize in the culinary and flavor fusion of California and Mexican cuisines.

“Cheese is at the heart of culinary innovation – from creative pizzas to flavorful to-go and fusion dishes. As the leading producer of Hispanic-style cheese and dairy products, we’re excited to add the Cal-Mex Invitational to our foodservice outreach program and to see what the chef’s develop,”

said Mike Gallagher, Business and Market Development Consultant for the CMAB. “These competitions offer a tremendous opportunity to partner with culinary professionals to spotlight their creativity using our sustainably sourced Real California dairy products.” 

California is a reliable, consistent source of sustainable dairy products used by chefs throughout the world. As the nation’s largest dairy state, California boasts an impressive lineup of award-winning cheesemakers and dairy processors, that are helping to drive dining innovation.

California leads the nation in milk production and is responsible for producing more butter, ice cream and nonfat dry milk than any other state. The state is the second-largest producer of cheese and yogurt. California milk and dairy foods can be identified by the Real California Milk seal, which certifies they are made with milk from the state’s dairy farm families.

2022-02-16T08:56:00-08:00February 16th, 2022|

Western Ag Processors Association’s Priscilla Rodriguez Completes Prestigious Ag Leadership Program

By Western Agricultural Processors Association

A journey began on October 10th, 2019 that lasted for more than 27 months, and finally came to a conclusion for the Association’s Director of Regulatory Affairs, Priscilla Rodriguez, on February 5, 2022.

This journey covered a span of more than 27 months, and included meetings that covered more than 125 days, not including travel and study time. It included trips to Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC, as well as Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic. Rodriguez was one of 24 members of the historic Class 50 of the California Agricultural Leadership Foundation program who completed their program where it began at California State University – Fresno on February 5th.

Disrupted by the Covid Pandemic, but not deterred, Class 50 weathered the storm to complete their program this past month. Rodriguez had the distinct honor addressing the commencement for Class 50 by giving the opening speech. In her comments, she began by stating “We started this program as strangers, quickly became friends and ultimately family. The bonds and friendships created through the program will continue on for years to come. We may all have different stories, but one thing is true for all of us. This program made a lasting impact through the books we read, people we met and the unforgettable experiences we lived.” She ended her opening remarks by encouraging her classmates “As we move forward in our lives, I challenge us to continue to be open minded, inquisitive, empathetic, passionate, resilient, and grateful, and leave your impact on your families, communities, ag industry, and the world.”

Truly words to live by, not just for her colleagues, but for all of us.

Association President/CEO Roger Isom remarked after the event, “Priscilla was made for the CALF program and the CALF program was made for her. The Association is incredibly proud of her for this accomplishment and her speech is indicative of her growth, and just the type of leader she has started to become.  The Association and the agricultural industry are lucky to have her.”

2022-02-15T09:21:55-08:00February 15th, 2022|

Applications Available for California Ag Leadership Program’s Class 52

By California Agricultural Leadership Foundation 

Applications are now being accepted for Class 52 of the California Agricultural Leadership Program (CALP). Applicants should be mid-career growers, farmers, ranchers and/or individuals working in other areas of California’s diverse agriculture industry.

The Ag Leadership Program, operated by the California Agricultural Leadership Foundation (CALF), is considered to be one of the premier leadership development experiences in the United States. More than 1,300 men and women have participated in the program and are influential leaders and active volunteers in agriculture, communities, government, business and other areas.

“As we open the application process for Class 52, we are committed to selecting a group of fellows who represent California’s large and very diverse agriculture industry,” said CALF President and CEO Dwight Ferguson. “Our unique curriculum, personalized coaching and a dedicated focus on lifelong learning enables us to produce leaders who benefit their communities, their companies and California agriculture as a whole.”

The 17-month fellowship focuses on mid-career professionals who have a high capacity to lead, a passion for California agriculture and an interest in self-growth and seeing their communities thrive. The program includes approximately 55 days of formal program activities. Four partner universities—Fresno State, UC Davis, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and Cal Poly Pomona—deliver comprehensive, diverse and high-impact curriculum designed to improve leadership skills. As a valuable extension to the monthly seminars, fellows participate in national and international travel seminars and receive individualized leadership development coaching.

CALF invests more than $50,000 per fellow to participate in the Ag Leadership Program. The costs are underwritten by individual and industry donations. Candidates are strongly encouraged to talk with Ag Leadership alumni about the program and to attend an informational event. All events will adhere to state and local guidelines for safety and health. 

Detailed program information and the phase one application are available online at www.agleaders.org/apply. Phase one of the three-phrase application process is due no later than April 27, 2022. Individuals are encouraged to complete the application as soon as possible.

2022-02-14T15:30:22-08:00February 14th, 2022|

Special Education Students Cultivate Farm Skills at South Coast REC

Partnership with Esperanza Education Center provides blueprint for other adult transition programs

By UCANR

For students at Esperanza Education Center, an adult transition program serving students with disabilities in south Orange County, there was something deeply satisfying about handpicking 2,000 pounds of avocados.

“There’s a tangible, visual element where you’re like, ‘Wow, I did that – I did it, I can see it, I can feel it in my bones and my muscles,’” said Ray Bueche, principal of the school in Mission Viejo, within the Saddleback Valley Unified School District. “There’s a real sense of accomplishment that you’re seeing in some of these students.”

Ranging in age from 18 to 22, the students are in an adult education program that helps advance their independent living skills and prepare them for meaningful work and careers. They are able to experience the thrill of the harvest – and a variety of other farming activities – through the school’s innovative partnership with UC South Coast Research and Extension Center, a UC Agriculture and Natural Resources facility that supports researchers and delivers outreach and education programs.

Given UC ANR’s emphasis on workforce development, Jason Suppes, a community education specialist at South Coast REC, contacted Bueche in 2019 about a potential collaboration. While Esperanza has many partnerships with retail stores and nonprofits that give students invaluable work experiences, none of them offer the farm environment that South Coast REC could provide.

“Part of developing [our students] is getting a wide range of opportunities in a variety of vocational areas,” Bueche explained. “Agriculture is one that’s very hard for us to find.”

Program ‘wildly successful’ from beginning

Unlike other job sites that bring the students in less frequently, South Coast REC committed to hosting the young people every week for three hours (COVID-19 measures permitting), with Suppes and colleague Tammy Majcherek leading them in planting, weeding, maintenance, harvesting and more.

“We can provide opportunities for students to learn skills that could help them potentially find employment in a garden center, in a nursery, at landscapers,” Suppes said. “The program was wildly successful out of the gate.”

Mike Seyler, an Esperanza teacher who accompanies the students to South Coast REC, has seen firsthand the positive impacts of the partnership. He said one student – who at first balked at the idea of being outside, getting dirty and performing physical labor – eventually grew to like the work and took great pride in pulling carrots from the ground and sharing them with his family.

“To physically actually ‘see’ the work you did – they don’t always get to do that,” Seyler said. “It was cool to see someone, who didn’t necessarily like being outdoors, really enjoy it now.”

The change of pace – and place – was especially beneficial for one young woman at Esperanza. Bueche said the nature of the work and the setting helped the student grow socially, as she relished the teamwork and camaraderie needed to accomplish their goals on the farm.

“We really saw a different person come out through her experiences there – she felt more self-confident; she was more personable with people; she was talking more,” said Bueche, who added that she has leveraged the skills she gained into a paid work-based learning experience with a local retailer.

Students bring produce to school, community

All students benefit from Esperanza’s partnership with South Coast REC, as surplus produce from the center’s fields is donated to make healthy school lunches. In addition, students use REC-grown fruits and vegetables at their monthly pop-up restaurant, where they hone skills in preparing and serving a three-course meal.

Their peers, who harvested the produce, derive immense satisfaction from seeing the fruits of their labor go directly to the school.

“They’re able to enjoy eating the stuff that they’re working for,” Seyler said. “And then they see everyone else enjoying it, and I think that really translates well for these guys.”

The students also played a prominent role in an avocado sale last summer, for which they picked 2,000 pounds of produce, bagged the fruit in 10-pound bags and then distributed preorders to the public from a stand at South Coast REC. Proceeds from the event were used to purchase farm tools, shirts and other gear.

“It was an incredible success – everyone loved the avocados,” Bueche said. “The students loved it; the parents came out; community members supported it.”

Those successes illustrate the power of a strong partnership; the South Coast REC team, in fact, received the school’s “Community Partner of the Year” Award for 2020-21, for persevering through the pandemic to deliver the beneficial programs for students.

Over the last two years, Suppes and Bueche – through a lot of creativity and some trial and error – have sketched a roadmap for growing productive relationships between similar organizations and adult transition programs. And after presenting those results to colleagues, other local school districts and nonprofits such as Goodwill and My Day Counts have contacted South Coast REC to provide similar experiences for community members.

2022-02-08T08:40:05-08:00February 8th, 2022|

Solano County Residents Majoring in Ag Could Share $15,000 in College Scholarships

Friends of Dixon May Fair to Award $15,000 in Ag Scholarships; Deadline March 1

By Kathy Keatley Garvey, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

The Friends of the Dixon May Fair this year will award eight college scholarships, totaling $15,000, to Solano County residents enrolled in a California college or university  and majoring in an agricultural-related field.  Applications must be postmarked by 5 p.m. March 1.

Scholarship chair Carrie Hamel of Dixon announced the awards are the $3000 Ester Armstrong Award and the $2500 JoAn Giannoni Award,  both in the four-year college category; and the $1500 Jack Hopkins Scholarship Award to a student attending a two-year college.  In addition, three $2000 scholarships  will be given in the four-year college category; and two 1000 scholarships  in the two-year college category.

The all-volunteer organization, headed by president Donnie Huffman of Vacaville, is the service-oriented and fundraising arm of the fair.  Since 2003, the Friends have awarded more than $200,000.  The organization raises funds from the sale of beverages at the four-day fair and donates the proceeds for exhibitor awards, building and grounds improvements, as well as college scholarships. Last year, however, the coronavirus pandemic mandates canceled the Dixon May Fair.

Applicants are scored on personal, civic and academic experience; academic standing; personal commitment and established goals; leadership potential; civic accomplishments; chosen field in the areas of agriculture, said Hamel.  Most applicants have experience in 4-H, FFA or Grange, criteria desired not mandated.

Agricultural-related fields, Hamel said, include such majors as agricultural and resource economics, agricultural business, agronomy and range science, agricultural science, agricultural systems management, animal science, avian sciences, bio-resource and agricultural engineering, plant protection science, dairy science, entomology, earth sciences, environmental horticultural science, environmental design, environmental management and protection, landscape architecture, food science, environmental toxicology, forestry and natural resources, fruit science, soils and biogeochemistry, agricultural education and communication, home economics, environmental resource sciences, agribusiness, pomology, animal science, vegetable crops, nematology, earth and soil sciences, plant pathology, food science and nutrition, wildlife and fisheries biology, horticulture and crop science, pest management, natural resources management, child, family and consumer science, viticulture and enology, atmospheric science, and  hydrologic science.

Last year’s top recipient was Kyle Esquer of Dixon, a student at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly), winner of the $3000 Ester Armstrong Scholarship Award. Linzie Goodsell of Dixon, a student at California State University, Chico, won the $2500 JoAn Giannoni Scholarship Award.  At the community college level, Vacaville resident Jared Tanaka, enrolled at Modesto Junior College, won the $1500 Jack Hopkins Scholarship. Other recipients of Friends of the Fair scholarships last year were Maya Prunty of Vacaville, a student at the University of California, Davis, $2000; and Haylee Hoffmann of Dixon, a student at Modesto Junior College, $1000.

The annual deadline to apply for the scholarships is 5 p.m., March 1. More information on the scholarship application rules is available on the Friends of the Fair Facebook site at https://www.facebook.com/FriendsoftheDixonMayFair. Applications must be on Friends of the Fair forms and include a personal essay and letters of support. They are to be mailed to the Friends of the Fair, P.O. Box 242, Dixon, Calif.

The scholarship committee, chaired by Hamel, also includes Tootie Huffman, Kathy Keatley Garvey and Linda Molina of Vacaville, and Marty Scrivens of Dixon.  Huffman serves as treasurer of the all-volunteer Friends of the Fair, and Scrivens as secretary.

 

2022-02-07T10:25:51-08:00February 7th, 2022|

Almond Board Announces Strong 2022 Almond Leadership Program

The 13th class of outstanding professionals begins a year-long immersion to help them become the next great California almond industry leaders.

By Almond Board of California

The Almond Board of California is proud to announce the Almond Leadership Program class of 2022, a group of 17 exceptional professionals expected to help lead the industry into the future.

This next generation of leaders comes from diverse backgrounds across the full range of the industry, from almond growers and processors to sales representatives, consultants, operations managers, pest control advisors and more. They were chosen from a highly qualified pool of nearly 50 applicants.

The Almond Leadership Program began in 2009 and has graduated more than 200 people, with dozens now serving on ABC workgroups, committees and even the Board of Directors. This 13th class will become immersed in every aspect of the industry, guided by volunteer mentors – many of them graduates of the program – who will help the new class further develop the skills, knowledge and perspective to improve their industry and their communities.

“This program helps mold great people into even greater leaders who continue to guide our industry forward,” said Jenny Nicolau, ABC’s senior manager of Industry Relations and Communications. “The industry is now seeing the enormous benefits from more than a decade of this program, and the 2022 class looks brighter than ever. I am certain that these talented, passionate people will continue to be great assets and advocates for our industry for years to come.”

Leadership class members – while still working at their jobs – will complete specialized trainings on all aspects of the industry, much of it tied to ABC activities in global marketing, production and nutrition research, food safety and more. They’ll also sharpen their communication skills and build lasting relationships with each other, ABC staff and other industry leaders.

“Nothing compares to hands-on experience and I look forward to tangibly learning more about aspects of the almond industry outside of my current reach and knowledge,” said Bethany Couchman, a manager at Eagle’s Rest Ranches in Merced County and a 2022 participant. “I’m grateful that the Almond Board is providing us the opportunity to gain specialized insight and training so we can give back to our communities as better equipped leaders.”

The leadership program will also offer a thorough look at the ways social, economic and environmental issues, and the regulatory climate, impact the industry. In addition, participants will take on a yearlong, self-directed project – possibly diving into a topic that interests them, or introducing an innovative technology or practice to their operation, or exploring a new idea to advance the industry. All will focus on improving the California almond community, and some past projects have led to important breakthroughs for the industry.

Leadership class members kicked off their training with a two-day orientation last week at the ABC offices in Modesto. It included a state of the industry discussion with ABC President and CEO Richard Waycott and one-on-one talks with their mentors.

“The program offers clear insight into the almond industry as a whole and gives first-hand examples of what it means to lead an industry and to give back,” said Chris Gallo, who has been both a participant and mentor. He is now the U.S. Western Region Sales and Marketing Vice President for Yara North America and is mentoring again in 2022. “It’s clear that this program continues to evolve to build leaders who will take the almond industry into the future. It’s truly a family that grows with every class.”

Once again, class members will raise money for California Future Farmers of America (FFA), pledging to raise more than $25,000 in scholarships for high school students interested in pursuing agriculture in college. Through the years, the leadership program has raised more than $200,000 for FFA.

The 2022 Almond Leadership class members are Jaspaul Bains, Bains Ag LLC; John Bodden III, Bayer Crop Science; Kate Capurso, Blue Diamond Growers; Bethany Couchman, Eagle’s Rest Ranches; Michael Coe, Blue Diamond Growers; Brady Colburn, Agri Technovation, Inc.; Ian Darling, Monte Vista Farming Co.; Jarred Greene, Nickel Family Farms dba San Juan Ranching Co.;  Thomas Fantozzi, Synagro Technologies; Matt Morelli, Scientific Methods Inc.; Joe Palomino, Axiom Ag; Ken Peelman, Monte Vista Farming Co.; Carson Pettit, RPAC, LLC; Rodney Ratzlaff, Loveland Products Inc./Nutrien Ag Solutions; Arjun Samran, Bapu Farming Co.; Kaisa Spycher, Spycher Farms, Inc.; Blake Wilbur, Koppert Biological Systems.

Bayer Crop Science is the sponsor of the 2022 class.

2022-02-04T13:55:22-08:00February 4th, 2022|

California Beef Council Announces New Executive Committee

By California Beef Council

The California Beef Council welcomed a new executive committee for 2022, with Cindy Tews of Fresno serving as chair for the coming year. Tews comes into the role on the heels of Tom Barcellos, who provided leadership and guidance as chair during 2021.

The announcement came at the close of the CBC’s annual meeting held December 7-8 at Pismo Beach. Tews takes the reins as the CBC begins its 68th year as the country’s oldest State Beef Council. Outgoing Chair Tom Barcellos of Porterville, will continue in an ex-officio role.

Tews is the co-owner of Fresno Livestock Commission, LLC, which has long had a role in the community. It is the only livestock market in Fresno County and serves as a gathering place where information is passed about beef quality assurance and the latest in production practices. The on-site café also provides a space for visitors to talk about what is going on in the community.

“As a CBC Board member, I get to see firsthand how invaluable that one Checkoff dollar is that is deducted for each head that we sell. I’m finding that dollar grows into so much more,” Tews said.

Looking ahead, the CBC plans to invest more than $1.2 million in 2022 to promote beef, provide consumer information, engage with foodservice and retail stakeholders, educate health and nutrition influencers, and provide educational and informational resources to beef producers.

The CBC Executive Committee includes:

  • Cindy Tews, chair (range)
  • Steven Maxey, vice chair (packer/processor)
  • Mike Williams (range)
  • Frank Gambonini (dairy)
  • Jarred Mello (dairy)
  • Mike Sulpizio (feeder)
  • Craig Finster (feeder)
  • Tom Barcellos, ex officio (dairy)

The CBC also welcomed the following new members and alternates to the council:

  • Lizette Cisneros, feeder alternate, Hanford
  • Frank Nunes, dairy member, Tulare
  • William Vanbeek, dairy member, Tipton
  • Frank Mendonsa, dairy alternate, Tulare

The CBC board is comprised of 42 members and alternates, each appointed by the California Secretary of Agriculture. Both the Executive Committee and the full council represent all segments of beef production within California, including range cattle, dairy cattle, feeders, packers/processers and the general public. A full list of the council is available here.

2022-02-02T10:53:41-08:00February 2nd, 2022|
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