Reducing ACP Spread In California

Asian citrus psyllid ACP

Reducing ACP Spread In California

May 8, 2019

Beth Grafton-Cardwell: Spread of Disease Must Be Prevented

By Patrick Cavanaugh, Editor

Collaborative changes are being made to combat the Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP). Beth Grafton-Cardwell is the director of Lindcove Research and Extension Center near Exeter, as well as a research entomologist with UC Riverside. She recently spoke at the 2019 Citrus Showcase in Visalia as a key speaker on the state of Huanglongbing (HLB) in California, with an overview of how to prevent ACP,—which vectors HLB, a fatal disease to citrus—from moving around the state.

We were trying to communicate why we've made the changes we've made for the industry that has been a collaborative effort between CDFA, growers, and the university, Grafton-Cardwell said. "We need better ways to prevent psyllids from moving around the state because they might have HLB in their bodies, and we've got to prevent the spread of the disease.

beth_grafton-cardwell

Beth Grafton-Cardwell

The Florida citrus industry did not do a great job in containing the Psyllid, and now HLB is rampant in the state's citrus industry, which has devastated the citrus economy there.

“Florida found that they did not do much to control psyllid movement, and they found that psyllids were moving in bulk citrus bins and retail nursery plants around the state, and within a concise amount of time, they spread the Psyllid and the disease everywhere,” Grafton-Cardwell said. “We're trying to avoid that. We have 100% tarping of citrus truckloads. We have treatments that have to be done if growers want to move citrus between major zones in California, so that we can prevent that kind of movement."

Conversations continue about quarantine areas in California to reduce spread.

“There's been a lot of discussion regarding quarantines because it's painful for some growers who have low Psyllid numbers to have to treat and to move their fruit to other zones."

“There's been a lot of questions. We did a lot of scientific analysis to look at impacts as well as numbers. It's not just about psyllid numbers; it's about their impact if growers were to move the disease into a high citrus growing region,” Grafton-Cardwell explained.

RelatedPost