Measuring Crop Protection Material Tolerances

Measuring Crop Protection Material Tolerances

December 11, 2017

Biological Tolerances May Be Needed

By Patrick Cavanaugh, Farm News Director

California Ag Today recently spoke with Gabrielle Ludwig, Director of Sustainability and Environmental Affairs for the Almond Board of California, about the issue of crop protection in almonds. Almonds are the number one specialty crop export. Almonds also remain the number one nut in global production and are California's number two agricultural crop.

Ludwig explained that pesticides are used and necessary in today's almond production. Pesticide residue is a concern for not only domestic production, but also for international distribution. And with biological products such as friendly fungi and bacteria, the biological industry noted that they are safe and free of residue tolerance.

“I would say for this industry, there's a couple of things going on in parallel, and they don't have exactly the same problems. So one is you have the sector where it is still a chemical that you're applying, but it may not have very much toxicity or the residues are, for whatever reason, vanished,” Ludwig said.

“In the United States, we can get an exemption from a tolerance, where EPA has looked at and said there's no health risk, and there's no need to set a maximum residue limit. For those products then the question becomes: Do you have the same standards in other markets?” Ludwig asked.

"And again, one example is that the EU does have an exemption for tolerance process, but they don't always have the same standards so EU is more likely to set a number than United States. And we have also seen examples where the United States is setting a number and the rest of the world says there's no need to set a number because it's a natural occurring compound."

“So if you look at a pheromone, which falls into a natural occurring arena, there, you're not even spraying the trees so it's a totally different ball game,” Ludwig said.

“With biologicals, again, it's a different ball game. You still need to have someone say, look at it, say it's safe; because it's going to be exempt from a tolerance."

"But currently, there's no testing for it,” Ludwig said. “With DNA technology, it probably wouldn't be that hard to start testing for biological products’ lack of residue, especially ones that go on the produce that is eaten.”

“So again, what we're saying here is, don't rely on the fact you can't be tested for it because we did that in the conventional pesticide arena and it's caught up with us,” Ludwig said.

More California Ag News

Making Comments with Data Carries Weight in Crop P... Make Comments When Needed By Patrick Cavanaugh Farm News Director Dave Brassard of Brassard Pesticide Regulatory Solutions, based in Washington D.C....
Cannabis Growers Not Following Regs Cannabis Growers Must Adhere to Crop Protection Regulations By Patrick Cavanaugh, Farm News Director There’s a whole lot of trouble going on for Cal...
Future of Integrated Pest Management IPM: A Decision Making Process By Joanne Lui, Associate Editor Lori Berger is the academic coordinator for the University of California's statewide ...
Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer, Study Finds Glyphosate Cancer Study Turns up Nothing By Patrick Cavanaugh, Farm News Director With all the clamor that glyphosate herbicide is a cancer causing ...